Tjelvar's Grave

Slite, Sweden

Tjelvar’s Grave is one of the best preserved stone ship settings in Gotland. According the legend Tjelvar, the first man lived in Gotland, is buried there. Archaeologists have dated the grave to made in the late Bronze Ages, 1100-500 BC.

Tjelvar’s grave is 18 metres long and 5 metres wide. The height of the gunwale stones diminishes towards the centre of the ship, which has also been filled with stones to form a boat-deck. A plundered stone-slab coffin, containing cremated bones and a few potsherds, was uncovered in an excavation in the 1930s.

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Details

Founded: 1100-500 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Bronze Age (Sweden)

More Information

www.segotland.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

april evans (3 months ago)
We As cool to see the grave and we found berries to eat :).
Ryan Evans (3 months ago)
I'd like to think Tjelvar was a real person and is buried here.... even if the legend itself is apocryphal. Whoever was interred here though, it's a historic site and well worth a visit.
Ashraf B (3 months ago)
An interesting site with lots of history
Sebastian Hökby (9 months ago)
Peaceful spirits in the beautiful forests of Gotland
Jorgen Hedman (3 years ago)
En rofylld fascinerande plats.
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