St. Clement Church Ruins

Visby, Sweden

To the south of St Nicholas's Church, among houses, are the remains of the Romanesque church of St Clement, built in the middle of the 13th century. Excavations have brought to light the foundations of three earlier churches. The oldest, dating from the 12th century, was probably one of the first stone-built churches in Visby. To the right of the church can be seen an old weapon house, in which the men deposited their arms before entering the church.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Smedjegatan 3, Visby, Sweden
See all sites in Visby

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.planetware.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcus Forelius (2 years ago)
By far one of the coolest places I’ve ever stayed at. Hotel is cute set on a cute lane with all sorts of ambience. The front desk staff is super friendly and helpful with food recommendations and places to see. Grounds were amazing with a nice central area for sitting with the ruins of an old church right on the property. I found the room just the right size with a very clean and comfortable bathroom and bed. I can’t highly recommend enough and hope I can be back as soon as possible!
Mikael Hällgren (2 years ago)
This is the second time that we visit Gotland and this wonderful hotel. The staff is fantastic, the rooms are cozy and unique in an antique setting. The breakfast is delicious. This is one of the best hotels I have stayed in and next time we go to Gotland we will yet again stay here.
Andreia RODRIGUES (2 years ago)
Cute hotel right in the middle of Visby. I would recommend it to someone looking for cosiness instead of luxury
Laura Dzemedzionaite (2 years ago)
Very very good! Outstanding service. Cosy and clean. Amazing location - a medieval church ruins in front of our doors, botanical gardens right around the corner, in the hard of the city but very quiet. I don't think I ever stayed in a place that focused as much on low environmental impact. Breakfast table exceptionally vegan friendly - wide variety of fresh veggies and fruits, hummus. Looking forward to our next stay here!
Jake Kmiech (3 years ago)
The BEST hotel I've ever stayed at. Great service, nice rooms, great location, great breakfast, all right next to some sweet views and ruins!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.