St. Clement Church Ruins

Visby, Sweden

To the south of St Nicholas's Church, among houses, are the remains of the Romanesque church of St Clement, built in the middle of the 13th century. Excavations have brought to light the foundations of three earlier churches. The oldest, dating from the 12th century, was probably one of the first stone-built churches in Visby. To the right of the church can be seen an old weapon house, in which the men deposited their arms before entering the church.

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Address

Smedjegatan 3, Visby, Sweden
See all sites in Visby

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.planetware.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Soran Mahmoudyan (2 years ago)
Great hotel. Helpful staff, nice breakfast. Great location and cleanly kept.
Björn Krafft (3 years ago)
Great room and terrific staff. A great place if you want a homely stay when exploring Visby!
Anders Ivarsson (3 years ago)
Beautiful small-scale hotel located more or less _in_ the ruins of an old church - you can enter the ruins from one of the two courtyards. Nice rooms and a very good breakfast buffet! Very helpful staff!
Joakim Lagerqvist (3 years ago)
Family friendly and very cozy boutique hotel. Historic, but spacious rooms. Excellent breakfast and friendly staff, highly recommended!
Marcus Forelius (4 years ago)
By far one of the coolest places I’ve ever stayed at. Hotel is cute set on a cute lane with all sorts of ambience. The front desk staff is super friendly and helpful with food recommendations and places to see. Grounds were amazing with a nice central area for sitting with the ruins of an old church right on the property. I found the room just the right size with a very clean and comfortable bathroom and bed. I can’t highly recommend enough and hope I can be back as soon as possible!
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