St. Lawrence's Church Ruins

Visby, Sweden

Saint Lawrence’s church (Sankt Lars) was built in the central parish around 1210-1220. In the same cemetery a German parish church, Holy Trinity (Drotten in Swedish), was built around 1240. The church was abandoned after the Reformation. Architecturally, Saint Lawrence has its models in Orthodox churches, and it has been wrongly suggested that it would have been a Russian church. It’s more reasonable to imagine an architect influenced by Russian architecture. Sometimes the church has been called Saint Anna (Sankta Anna) the mother of the Virgin Mary.

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Address

Syskongatan 4, Visby, Sweden
See all sites in Visby

Details

Founded: 1210-1220
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

april evans (3 years ago)
It was beautiful inside. Take a minute to see it.
Jason Martin (3 years ago)
Fantastic ruin with lots of space and perfect for shows. Just plain beautiful.
Shariq Siddiqui (3 years ago)
This church is a Heritage Monument, it was closed when we reach, and it was being repaired at that time...
Paulina Raduchowska (4 years ago)
Amazing venue in a beautiful ruined church.
Aleksandras Kulak (4 years ago)
There is no possibility to see it inside
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