Ponte Vella is a medieval footbridge built on Roman foundations in Ourense. At one time, it was considered to be the biggest bridge in all of Spain.

The original bridge across the Minho River was built during the first century rule of Emperor Augustus though other sources state that it was built during the Trajan period. A mention is made of this bridge in the will of Doña Urraca, where it is said that it was repaired with funds provided by Ferdinand III. From the Middle Ages, it has provided access to the city of Ourense for trade and pilgrimage.

The structure was rebuilt in 1230 by Bishop Lorenzo on Roman foundations (original piers), and repaired in 1449 by Bishop Pedro de Silva. It then measured 402 m long, with an arch span of 48 m. However, the main arch collapsed in 1499 and the bridge was rebuilt in 1679 to a length of 370 metres with seven arched spans, the main span measuring 43 metres.

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    Founded: 1230
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    Mark Auchincloss (14 months ago)
    Popular and well maintained shopping centre in centre of Ourense anchored by Gadis Supermaket. The car park is subterranean and relatively cheap. Worth going to top floor with restaurants and bars and the outside terrace has amazing views towards the River Miño and of all Ourense's bridges including its emblematic Roman Bridge. You can appreciate the setting of Ourense against the backdrop of mountains.
    Ve Rena (2 years ago)
    Here you'll find a bit of everything, with restaurants sharing a nice terrace with views of the river, a movie theater, ....
    Ve Rena (2 years ago)
    Here you'll find a bit of everything, with restaurants sharing a nice terrace with views of the river, a movie theater, ....
    Diana Aguiar (2 years ago)
    The architecture is awful, it has the basic clothes store and nothing more. The restaurants only offered fast food and is a kind expensive in relation with the quality
    Diana Aguiar (2 years ago)
    The architecture is awful, it has the basic clothes store and nothing more. The restaurants only offered fast food and is a kind expensive in relation with the quality
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