Castro de Viladonga

Castro de Rei, Spain

The archaeological and museum complex of Viladonga occupies the peak of a mountain from the visitor can behold the spectacular view of the Terra Chá (Flat Land) of Lugo and the mountain chains of Monciro, Pradairo and Meira. It is located in Castro de Rei.

The archaeological importance and the historical interest of the Castro de Viladonga were showcased after excavations initiated in 1971, due to the monumentality and the diversity of structures discovered and to the quantity and quality of the findings. The site is a remarkable example of settlement, especially between the 2nd and 5th centuries AD, very important for the knowledge, study and understanding of the castro world after the Roman conquer. The archaeological works of excavation and cleaning and consolidation are still taking place in the castro.

The Castro de Viladonga Museum was opened in November 1986. The museum main aim pivots around the interpretation and explanation of the site and the host and exhibition of materials from the successive excavations. It is located in between the two last walls of the southeast side of the castro, very close to the peak.

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Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto González Paez (3 years ago)
Very good
arturowing (4 years ago)
Amazing! Woth it to visit! Very well done museum. Free entrance
Roberto Otero (4 years ago)
Amazing place. Great example of the preroman civilization in Galiza. Worth to pay a visit!!
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