Roman Walls of Lugo

Lugo, Spain

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO's World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.

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Address

Rúa da Tinería 48, Lugo, Spain
See all sites in Lugo

Details

Founded: 3rd century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

San InfoTech (Sanjay Sirsat) (2 months ago)
The Roman walls of Lugo (Spanish, Galician: Muralla Romana de Lugo) were constructed in the 3rd century and are still largely intact, stretching over 2 kilometers around the historic centre of Lugo in Galicia (Spain).
Laura Skillen (11 months ago)
This wall is beautiful in its own right, and makes for a lovely sunset stroll. It's around 2km in length and offers views both within and without the city. A really nice wind-down after a day of walking the Camino!
Laura May, PhD (11 months ago)
This wall is beautiful in its own right, and makes for a lovely sunset stroll. It's around 2km in length and offers views both within and without the city. A really nice wind-down after a day of walking the Camino!
Igor K (12 months ago)
Nice place for a short visit.
Maria Barreiros (13 months ago)
La Muralla dates back to the 3rd century. Built by the Romans, it is mostly intact. The views on the wall aren't the greatest but walking this wall leaves anyone impressed with the labor of those who completed this construction so long ago. A must see Lugo.
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