Provincial Museum of Lugo

Lugo, Spain

In 1932 the Provincial Council of Lugo created the museum in order to collect and protect the patrimony of the province, which were spread in individual collections and public institutions. At first, the museum would be located in the Palacio Provincial de San Marcos. In 1957 the museum is moved to the present location, the rooms of the old San Francisco convents and a new building designed by the architect Manuel Gómez Román. From this moment on, the museum enjoyed several extensions.

The first floor houses a collection of tiles from the 3rd century, found in a plot in Armañá Street (Lugo). It also presents the collections of sacred art, including a stone image of the Saviour coming from San Pedro de Fiz de Muxa (Lugo), a wide range of Gothic Mannerist and Baroque imagery, the processional crosses made of silver and other objects for religious purposes. In the cloister, the visitor can behold pieces of epigraphy, heraldry and other collections in stone. The convent kitchen of this floor shows the etnographic funds, next to the refectory.

The high part of the cloister is devoted to Prehistory and Archaeology. The visitor will find a chronological tour from the Palaeolithic to the end of Romanisation, as well as the ceramics, glass, numismatic and medals collections.

On the second floor the visitor will enjoy the Galician art collections, focused in painting and sculpture from the 19th and 20th century with monographic halls dedicated to Antonio Fernández, Julia Minguillón and Corredoira, along with the ceramic collection from Sargadelos - which is a separate hall hosting pieces from all periods of production of the Real Fábrica.

In 2010, the first floor of the new building (opened in 1997) was restored, allowing space for Galician drawings and engravings sections. The halls are monographic for Castelao, Prieto Nespereira and Castro Gil, maintaining the chandelier collection.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Praza da Soidade 5, Lugo, Spain
See all sites in Lugo

Details

Founded: 1932
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Susan Henley (2 months ago)
Very interesting and all free didn't cover all of it will go back
Bon Confidant (10 months ago)
Really extensive collection of every type of art and artifact, going back to prehistoric ages. Staff very helpful, mostly, and mask rule is strictly enforced
Hilda Velasco (11 months ago)
It is much bigger than what it seems, so you'll need at least good 2 hours to see it full, dedicating just a seconds to each piece of art or archeological artifact.
Motorhome Quest (12 months ago)
There were many varied exhibits across several rooms and floors which were interesting. Follow the white arrows on the floor in order to see everything.
EdgarTxr (13 months ago)
From the exterior, it seems a small and unimpressive museum, however once start the tour indoors you find out the place is actually huge. Besides religious art, Romanesque pieces, and artwork from locals, you will find an amazing and priceless collection on the second floor: stone age artefacts. At this museum you can see one biggest golden collars from prehistoric times. Amazing. Just a pity, one cannot make photos of the golden artwork or anything on the second floor of the museum.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Petersberg Citadel

The Petersberg Citadel is one of the largest extant early-modern citadels in Europe and covers the whole north-western part of the Erfurt city centre. It was built after 1665 on Petersberg hill and was in military use until 1963. It dates from a time when Erfurt was ruled by the Electors of Mainz and is a unique example of the European style of fortress construction. Beneath the citadel is an underground maze of passageways that can be visited on guided tours organised by Erfurt Tourist Office.

The citadel was originally built on the site of a medieval Benedictine Monastery and the earliest parts of the complex date from the 12th century. Erfurt has also been ruled by Sweden, Prussia, Napoleon, the German Empire, the Nazis, and post-World War II Soviet occupying forces, and it was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). All of these regimes used Petersberg Citadel and had an influence on its development. The baroque fortress was in military use until 1963. Since German reunification in 1990, the citadel has undergone significant restoration and it is now open to the public as a historic site.