Provincial Museum of Lugo

Lugo, Spain

In 1932 the Provincial Council of Lugo created the museum in order to collect and protect the patrimony of the province, which were spread in individual collections and public institutions. At first, the museum would be located in the Palacio Provincial de San Marcos. In 1957 the museum is moved to the present location, the rooms of the old San Francisco convents and a new building designed by the architect Manuel Gómez Román. From this moment on, the museum enjoyed several extensions.

The first floor houses a collection of tiles from the 3rd century, found in a plot in Armañá Street (Lugo). It also presents the collections of sacred art, including a stone image of the Saviour coming from San Pedro de Fiz de Muxa (Lugo), a wide range of Gothic Mannerist and Baroque imagery, the processional crosses made of silver and other objects for religious purposes. In the cloister, the visitor can behold pieces of epigraphy, heraldry and other collections in stone. The convent kitchen of this floor shows the etnographic funds, next to the refectory.

The high part of the cloister is devoted to Prehistory and Archaeology. The visitor will find a chronological tour from the Palaeolithic to the end of Romanisation, as well as the ceramics, glass, numismatic and medals collections.

On the second floor the visitor will enjoy the Galician art collections, focused in painting and sculpture from the 19th and 20th century with monographic halls dedicated to Antonio Fernández, Julia Minguillón and Corredoira, along with the ceramic collection from Sargadelos - which is a separate hall hosting pieces from all periods of production of the Real Fábrica.

In 2010, the first floor of the new building (opened in 1997) was restored, allowing space for Galician drawings and engravings sections. The halls are monographic for Castelao, Prieto Nespereira and Castro Gil, maintaining the chandelier collection.

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Address

Praza da Soidade 5, Lugo, Spain
See all sites in Lugo

Details

Founded: 1932
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Good Earth (12 months ago)
Worth the visit. Entrance is free but collection is good. See the Roman site, gold and sundial sections. Wonderful!
Pat Quaid (2 years ago)
Worth more time than we had available. Very nice exhibits in quite different collections. The use of the old building was exceptionally well done.
Glenn Colley (2 years ago)
Roman slaves built the town walls, still in good shape.
Stephen Wardle (2 years ago)
Interesting building (partly an old monastery) and good exhibits, although some sections could do with updating, particularly the ancient archeology displays in the upper cloister. Great that's it's open all day ( no lunch break) and free.
Ja Da (2 years ago)
Excellent museum! Doesn't allow many photos. But excellent collection of exhibits. Fascinating collection of African art, roman gold . A one stop shop for anything to do with the city.
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.