Husaby Church is one of the most interesting historical sites in Sweden. The first stave church was built probably in the 10th century. Olof Skötkonung, the first Christian king of Sweden, is rumoured to have allowed himself to be baptised at a well by the church in 1008. Husaby was also the seat of bishop until 1150s.

The present church was built in the early 1100s and influenced by German and English missionaries. Architecturally, it is remarkable for its steep walls and high towers, arguably the only Romanesque architecture in Sweden of that kind. Arches were added in the 15th century.

The most interesting artefact inside is the medieval bishop’s seat. There are also two graves, which (according to tradition) belong to King Olof Skötkonung and his wife Estrid.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Wikipedia

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Address

2717 Husaby, Götene, Sweden
See all sites in Götene

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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