Västerplana Church

Källby, Sweden

Västerplana Church date from the 12th century. In the 18th century the church was considered to be too small and therefore it was enlarged and transformed into a cruciform church. Thus the direction of its nave is no longer west to east but north to south, where the chancel is today. The northern arm of the cross was begun in 1724 and the southern one was finished in 1737. This new part of the church got a high altar in the 1730s and paintings on the ceiling at about the same time. The old pulpit from 1636 was now rebuilt and placed in the new chancel in the south.

The remarkable medieval baptismal font has been attributed to a certain Master Othelric, whose signature you can find in the church of Skälvum, only a few kilometres from here. His works show traces of German as well as of English influence, and so experts assume that he was born in Germany but learned his craft mainly in England.

The Madonna with the Christ-child from the early 13th century is a good specimen of Swedish wood-carving.There is also a somewhat younger wooden sculpture representing St John the Baptist. The triumphal crucifix originally belonged to the neighbouring church of Medelplana and can be dated back to the end of the Middle Ages, but the cross belonging to it is not as old as that.

The paintings on the walls of the old chancel were created in the 1630s and those on the ceiling in the 18th century, the latter inspired by what could be seen and admired in the Castle of Läckö.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

2714, Källby, Sweden
See all sites in Källby

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulrika Gustafson (3 years ago)
Mycket vacker och stillsam kyrka
Veronica Marklund (3 years ago)
Fin plats
Gunnar Bergqvist (4 years ago)
M Ali (5 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Trepucó Talayotic Settlement

The settlement of Trepucó is one of the largest on Menorca, covering an area of around 49,240 square metres. Today, only a small part of the site can still be seen, the two oldest buildings, the talaiots (1000-700 BCE). Other remains include parts of the wall, two square towers on the west wall, the taula enclosure and traces of dwellings from the post-Talayotic period (650-123 BCE).The taula enclosure is one of the biggest on the island, despite having been subjected to what, by today’s standards, would be considered clumsy restoration work. This is one of the sites excavated around 1930 by Margaret Murray, a British archaeologist who was a pioneer of scientific research on Prehistoric Menorca.

The houses are perfectly visible on the west side of the settlement, due to excavation work carried out several years ago. They are multi-lobed with a central patio area and several rooms arranged around the outside. Looking at the settlement, it is easy to see that there was a clear division between the communal area (between the large talaiot and the taula) and the domestic area.The houses near the smaller talaiot seem to have been abandoned at short notice, meaning that the archaeological dig uncovered exceptionally well-preserved domestic implements, now on display in the Museum of Menorca.The larger talayot and the taula stand at the centre of a star-shaped fortification built during the 18th century.