Carini Castle

Carini, Italy

Carini Castle was erected between the late 9th and early 12th century, certainly on a previous Arab construction, by the first Norman feudal lord Rodolfo Bonello, warrior in the retinue of Count Roger. The excavations carried out during the recent restoration, both in the east and in the north, they have surfaced walls of earlier times to the Norman.

The castle has a large courtyard, where there is the residential structure made primarily in two elevations. The ground floor consists of: a room with a cross vault that contains a wall in stone, which originally served as the exterior wall. In this are visible windows and a pointed front door with splays of the old medieval structure; A large hall divided by two pointed arches with the central column; The private chapel where you can admire a beautiful wooden tabernacle, with Corinthian columns that mark prospectively space.

Outside the chapel, a portal giving access to the bastion, where the remains of a perimeter wall are visible. The second floor, reached by an outside stone staircase Billiemi, architect Matteo Carnalivari, comprises: the ballroom, classic example of fifteenth-century room with coffered wooden ceiling, fireplace adorned with the emblem of La Grua and large windows with leaning seats and from the sleeping area, composed of frescoed rooms, where you can admire a beautiful eighteenth-century decorated door that characterizes the alcove. A small circular staircase leads to the kitchen, while another adjoining rooms on the upper floors. From the west side there is access to an area called 'Foresteria.' A staircase leads to the castle tower or male. The continuous tower with a wooden gallery from which a mullioned window with the emblem of Abbate can observe the south side of the country.

The Abbate family commanded the castle from 1283 to 1397 after Palmerio Abbate campaigned with Geovanni Procida during the War of the Sicilian Vespers. The castle was then commanded by the La Grua Talamanca family. Here is the time to cruise with plumes also ending with Billiemi stone. A scale, which no longer exists, allowing the output to the battlements of the tower. From a door, characterized by an arch lancet, you exit into a small terrace, recently created, which allows to observe the city.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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