Greek Theatre of Syracuse

Syracuse, Italy

The Greek theatre of Syracuse lies on the south slopes of the Temenite hill, overlooking the modern city of Syracuse. It was first built in the 5th century BC, rebuilt in the 3rd century BC and renovated again in the Roman period. Today, it is a part of the Unesco World Heritage Site of 'Syracuse and the Rocky Necropolis of Pantalica'.

It seems that the theatre was renovated in the third century, transforming it into the form seen today. Its structure was extended, taking into account the shape of the Temenite hill and the best possibilities for acoustics. Another typical characteristic of Greek theatres is the celebration of the panoramic view, also applied to the theatre of Syracuse, offering a view of the bay of the port and the island of Ortygia.

During the Roman era, important modifications were made to the theatre, perhaps at the time when the colonia was founded in the early Augustan period. The cavea was modified to a semicircular form, typical of Roman theatres, rather than the horseshoe used in Greek theatres and corridors allowing access past the scene building (parodoi). The scene building itself was reconstructed in monumental form with rectangular niches at centre and two niches with a semicircular plan on the sides, containing doors to the scene.

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Founded: 5th century BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladimir Balaz (12 months ago)
The well preserved Greek theatre is the most interesting part of the Neapolis archaeological park.
Ian Templeton (2 years ago)
Amazing structure and location. Full of history. Worth a visit.
Ognyan Ivanov (2 years ago)
Fantastic place, very inspiring! Very good maintained, still looking as it is active. Amazing building and fascinating place. Also the cave holes around are very impressive! Of course the whole Parc is fabulous! Strongly recommended!
Ognyan Ivanov (2 years ago)
Fantastic place, very inspiring! Very good maintained, still looking as it is active. Amazing building and fascinating place. Also the cave holes around are very impressive! Of course the whole Parc is fabulous! Strongly recommended!
Fabiano Vivori (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, nicely preserved and with a wonderful view between sea and theatre. Highly recommended.
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