Palazzo Montalto

Syracuse, Italy

Palazzo Montalto was built in 1397 for Maciotta Mergulese. In the 15th century, the Queen of Aragon gave the palace to Filippo Montalto. It was used as a temporary hospital during a cholera epidemic in 1837, and it was used by the Figlie della Carità in 1854.

The palace is built in Chiaramonte Gothic architecture. Its façade is characterized by a number of mullioned windows decorated with flower motifs. It also has a palline losanghe cornice, similar to the one found at Palazzo Falson in Mdina, Malta.

The portal is topped by an aedicula containing a marble slab with an inscription and the date of construction.

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Details

Founded: 1397
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Fred Vezzani (2 years ago)
Don't miss David's Star and the Arabic writings
Jennifer Delimata (4 years ago)
Interesting place.
Jennifer Delimata (4 years ago)
Interesting place.
Dario Scarfì (Dario_s) (5 years ago)
It is the most important palace of Chiaramontana gothic architecture in Sicily
Dario Scarfì (Dario_s) (5 years ago)
It is the most important palace of Chiaramontana gothic architecture in Sicily
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