Originally built in the Gothic style of the late 14th century, this complex of buildings was later reconstructed in Baroque style. From 1911 to 1913, it was rebuilt again and became a church. It is now the Parish church of the Holy Trinity, serving the population of Krašić, which is located near Jastrebarsko, about 50 km southwest of Zagreb. Enthusiastic visitors to the region will also not want to miss the nearby Pribić Castle, which is located just three kilometres east of Krašić, It is also fantastic.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mirjana Martinjak (5 months ago)
Beautiful church with a very nice environment ,. In this place everyone can find divine peace.
Alfonz Juric (8 months ago)
Super
Stella Gabrić (9 months ago)
A wonderful lecture about life bl. Aloysius Stepinac. In the church where he also lived! A wonderful feeling.
Zlatko Kadoić MSc (9 months ago)
An imposing religious, historical and cultural building in which anyone who wants it can for a moment find their much needed spiritual peace with thoughts directed at the great Croatian Cardinal and man ... Alojzij Stepinac.
zeljko krivacic (2 years ago)
ok
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