National Opera House

Riga, Latvia

The National Opera House was constructed in 1863 by architect Ludwig Bohnstedt from St. Petersburg, for the then German-speaking City Theatre. It has been refurbished several times; 1882-1887 (following a fire in 1882), 1957–1958, 1991-1995 (following independence). A modern annex was added in 2001 with a 300-seat New Hall.

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Details

Founded: 1863
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jānis Ķengurs (4 months ago)
Carmen. Modern with hip hop and big ass. Karmena. Graffiti, hiphop, breakdance un liela pakaļa ir tas kas nebija operā parasti un Karmenas rakstīšanas gadsimta laikā, taču ir tagad Operā mūsdienīgajā interpretācijā.
Adela Vitkovska (4 months ago)
Latvian national opera is a perfect place to visit during your stay in Riga. For affordable price you can experience a high quality performance! I visited Romeo & Juliet and the ballet was really excellent!
Arturas Dulka (4 months ago)
Coming from Lithuania. The opera house is smaller than we have in Lithuania, seeing the scene from above is pretty hard. Had a hard time. But overall its fine.
Flams LV (4 months ago)
Awesome place, I go there almost every day. To ease things out for me, I started to work there, that was 12 years ago.
Marina Wilson (6 months ago)
Offers a great variety of performances. In particularly I always enjoy their ballet. Highly recommended.
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