St. John's Church

Riga, Latvia

St. John's Church was built in the 13th century, probably between 1234-1297. It was originally home of the Dominican monks, but over the centuries fell into the possession of the Lutherans. It has also served as an arsenal for the city.

The most notable features of this unheralded church are the impressive 15th century sculptures of St. Peter and St. Paul which adorn the the 18th century altar. According the legend two monks who were bricked to the southern wall during the construction. They spent all their life long and were fed trough a window from the outside.

References:
  • Robin McKelvie, Jenny McKelvie. Thomas Cook Traveller Guides Latvia
  • rigalatvia.net

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Address

Skarnu iela 24, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheRin30 (3 years ago)
Церковь считается старейшей действующей как в Риге, так и на территории всей Латвии. Очень интересен ребристый готический потолок, который не типичен для Прибалтики. Но самое главное в церкви - акустика и орган. Именно поэтому она стала местом проведения концертов, которые проходят достаточно регулярно. Непередаваемые ощущения от звука!
Ineta Osipoviča (3 years ago)
Pagrūti atrast ieeju. Priekš koncertiem laba akustika, kā jau visās baznīcās.
Monika S (3 years ago)
Diese evangelische Kirche liegt gleich links hinter der Petri-Kirche und ist eine der ältesten im gotischen Stil erbauten Gotteshäuser. Großartig ist die Decke mit dem Sternrippen-Gewölbe. Es wurde um eine Spende gebeten. Meine Skizze zeigt sie von außen und das Gewölbe.
Hugo bellem westin (4 years ago)
It was a beautiful sight to set my eyes on. Especially the painter tree roof and other things. Low entry fee of a few euros is also a plus.
Ricardo Liberato (6 years ago)
A church with an open door, lovely inside and outside.
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.