St. John's Church

Riga, Latvia

St. John's Church was built in the 13th century, probably between 1234-1297. It was originally home of the Dominican monks, but over the centuries fell into the possession of the Lutherans. It has also served as an arsenal for the city.

The most notable features of this unheralded church are the impressive 15th century sculptures of St. Peter and St. Paul which adorn the the 18th century altar. According the legend two monks who were bricked to the southern wall during the construction. They spent all their life long and were fed trough a window from the outside.

References:
  • Robin McKelvie, Jenny McKelvie. Thomas Cook Traveller Guides Latvia
  • rigalatvia.net

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Address

Skarnu iela 24, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheRin30 (2 years ago)
Церковь считается старейшей действующей как в Риге, так и на территории всей Латвии. Очень интересен ребристый готический потолок, который не типичен для Прибалтики. Но самое главное в церкви - акустика и орган. Именно поэтому она стала местом проведения концертов, которые проходят достаточно регулярно. Непередаваемые ощущения от звука!
Ineta Osipoviča (2 years ago)
Pagrūti atrast ieeju. Priekš koncertiem laba akustika, kā jau visās baznīcās.
Monika S (2 years ago)
Diese evangelische Kirche liegt gleich links hinter der Petri-Kirche und ist eine der ältesten im gotischen Stil erbauten Gotteshäuser. Großartig ist die Decke mit dem Sternrippen-Gewölbe. Es wurde um eine Spende gebeten. Meine Skizze zeigt sie von außen und das Gewölbe.
Hugo bellem westin (3 years ago)
It was a beautiful sight to set my eyes on. Especially the painter tree roof and other things. Low entry fee of a few euros is also a plus.
Ricardo Liberato (5 years ago)
A church with an open door, lovely inside and outside.
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