St. John's Church

Riga, Latvia

St. John's Church was built in the 13th century, probably between 1234-1297. It was originally home of the Dominican monks, but over the centuries fell into the possession of the Lutherans. It has also served as an arsenal for the city.

The most notable features of this unheralded church are the impressive 15th century sculptures of St. Peter and St. Paul which adorn the the 18th century altar. According the legend two monks who were bricked to the southern wall during the construction. They spent all their life long and were fed trough a window from the outside.

References:
  • Robin McKelvie, Jenny McKelvie. Thomas Cook Traveller Guides Latvia
  • rigalatvia.net

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Address

Skarnu iela 24, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheRin30 (2 months ago)
Церковь считается старейшей действующей как в Риге, так и на территории всей Латвии. Очень интересен ребристый готический потолок, который не типичен для Прибалтики. Но самое главное в церкви - акустика и орган. Именно поэтому она стала местом проведения концертов, которые проходят достаточно регулярно. Непередаваемые ощущения от звука!
Ineta Osipoviča (2 months ago)
Pagrūti atrast ieeju. Priekš koncertiem laba akustika, kā jau visās baznīcās.
Monika S (5 months ago)
Diese evangelische Kirche liegt gleich links hinter der Petri-Kirche und ist eine der ältesten im gotischen Stil erbauten Gotteshäuser. Großartig ist die Decke mit dem Sternrippen-Gewölbe. Es wurde um eine Spende gebeten. Meine Skizze zeigt sie von außen und das Gewölbe.
Hugo bellem westin (2 years ago)
It was a beautiful sight to set my eyes on. Especially the painter tree roof and other things. Low entry fee of a few euros is also a plus.
Ricardo Liberato (4 years ago)
A church with an open door, lovely inside and outside.
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Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.