Poggiodiana Castle

Ribera, Italy

The remains of Poggiodiana Castle, or Misilcassino Castle, of Ribera are constituted by part of the perimeter walls and two towers, a quadrangular portion and a cylindrical, 25 meters in height and about 30 meters in circumference, of particular interest for the characteristic crowning corbels. Developed in about 3000 m² with an irregular plan, from the north side svettava on a precipice of over 300 meters, at the foot of which flows the river vegetables, east one sees the village of La Ribera. The fortress was firmly closed by an alignment of internal manufactured high approximately 20 meters and reinforced by a second defense wall. From a door on the sixth acute reached a second courtyard, where insisted the guard post with the accommodation of squires and the armoury, and opened the magazines and the scuderia. From the courtyard, thanks to the stairs, you saliva on the upper floors, where the lords were staying in the large apartments.

The castle was built in the 12th century by the Normans in defense of small neighboring communities and land between the Platani (Eraclea Minoa) and Triocala (Caltabellotta), and known until the 14th century with the name saraceno of Misilcassino, i.e. place of descent on horseback. Granted to Maletta family, from these was inherited by Scaloro degli Uberti, who made himself guilty of perfidy you saw confiscate the castle that was given to Monterosso for subsequently passes to the Chiaramonte and Guglielmo Peralta. In the fifteenth century it passed into the possession of the Counts Luna, in memory of these changed its name to take finally the appellative of Castello di Poggiodiana in honor of the noblewoman Diana Moncada, daughter of the prince of Paternò Luigi Guglielmo Moncada and wife of Vincenzo Luna.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Ribera, Italy
See all sites in Ribera

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.e-borghi.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Domenico Cufalo (9 months ago)
Improved since I last visited, but still a bit abandoned and underpriced
Giovanni Abatangelo (10 months ago)
Beautiful quad tour with BG racing. Very knowledgeable and kind instructors. Experience to do absolutely
Roberto Cosentino (10 months ago)
Very suggestive place, too bad that degradation reigns despite the European funding received, it seems that a mediocre consolidation work has been carried out. Go with the magna magna
EMANUEL SORTINO (2 years ago)
Must see! Beautiful setting, great view! Enjoy the natural beauty!
Francesco Cascio (5 years ago)
Only ruins, where is the castle?
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