Santi Pietro e Paolo d'Agrò

Casalvecchio Siculo, Italy

Santi Pietro e Paolo d’Agrò church one of the foremost examples on Sicily of Norman architecture. The church was constructed during the 12th century as part of a Basilian monastery. Its exterior is characterised by its block-like form, but the facade is richly decorated. Inside, the church has the plan of a basilica with three aisles. Two domes rise from the central nave, one above its centre and one above the choir.

The architecture of the church displays influences from a vast variety of sources, and constitutes heritage of Muslims, Byzantines, and Normans. The block-like form of the exterior is reminiscent of North African contemporary architecture while the floor plan of the church is similar to the way churches were built in the Byzantine architectural tradition. Its principle of construction at the same time is essentially that of Western European Gothic architecture. In its details and decorations, too, the church exhibits a wealth of influences (e.g. in the use of muqarnas vaulting).

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Donatella Ruggeri (17 months ago)
Beautiful church with 4 styles: Arabic, Byzantine, Christian and Orthodox. Unfortunately it was closed despite being open on the site.
Donatella Ruggeri (17 months ago)
Beautiful church with 4 styles: Arabic, Byzantine, Christian and Orthodox. Unfortunately it was closed despite being open on the site.
Anna Aiello (2 years ago)
Really beautiful and unexpected. Unfortunately, it is not indicated and can only be visited externally
Anna Aiello (2 years ago)
Really beautiful and unexpected. Unfortunately, it is not indicated and can only be visited externally
Christian Leo (2 years ago)
I arrived by bike from Santa Teresa di Riva. The route along the Agró stream is suggestive. This path has been well conceived, but is now abandoned to itself. However it is beautiful. The sacred place is valued with commitment, despite the scarce resources and the "forgotten by God" position. A pearl in the midst of a wild nature. It is evident that the work was of Arab origin, as well as the village of Casal كاسال Old. However, only hints on the history after the Norman conquest are given. Absolutely out of place instead the graves of the family of the Kingdom of Italy Knight (can not remember the name for non assecondarne vanity), dated end of '800. However, you are in a small Aya Sophia.
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