Grebenshchikov Church

Riga, Latvia

The first wooden place of worship was built here in 1760, and the current building was completed in 1814. It is home to one of the largest congregations of Old Believers in the world (about 10,000), an Orthodox Christian sect that fled persecution in Russia in the 17th century.

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Details

Founded: 1760-1814
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teresa Kock (11 months ago)
This is astonishing beautiful place. The grace of the icons... The peace and calm in the atmosphere are something so wonderful I have nowhere else felt. My Husband and I are extremely grateful for the very kind elder man at the gate who let us in, made possible to visit the beautiful church. We expected that in best case we may perhaps look into the church from a entrance, but we were guided and also let set candles and pray there. I recommened every (esp. christian) person visit this place to pray.
Oks Ana Kot (23 months ago)
Calm and strong place
Alex Yanshevics (2 years ago)
There is only one such prayer house!
Teresa Kock (2 years ago)
This is astonishing beautiful plcae. The grace of the icons... The peace and calm in The atmosphere are something so wonderful I have nowhere else felt. My Husband and I are extremely grateful for the very kind elder man at the Gate who let us in, made possible to visit the beautiful church. We expected that in best case we may perhaps loi into Into The church from a Dior, but we were guided and also let set candles and pray there. I recommened every Christian person visit this place to pray.
Gintaras Slabada (2 years ago)
World's Largest Old Believers' Church 4000 people can pray at one time.
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