Jewish Museum of Latvia

Riga, Latvia

The museum “Jews in Latvia” was established in 1989 to research, popularize and commemorate the history of Latvia's Jewish community. The museum's exhibition is housed in three halls in the historical building of former Jewish theatre.

The visitors of the museum can get acquainted with different aspects of Latvian Jewish history and culture from the beginnings in XVI century and to 1945 – legal status and economic activities, education and religion, political and intellectual pursuits. The special section is dedicated to Holocaust and rescuing of the Jews in Nazi-occupied Latvia.

In the collection of the museum are stored close to 14,000 units – documents, photos, books and artifacts. Of special interest is wide range of XIX-XX century memoirs, the rich collection of family photos, as well as printed materials of different Jewish organizations from interwar era.

We will be grateful for help provided in broadening the collection of the museum with the documents and photos from your private archives and family albums.

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Address

Skolas iela 6, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1989
Category: Museums in Latvia
Historical period: Soviet Era (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeri Pliner (3 years ago)
Excellent source of information on the holocaust in Latvia as well as Jewish life and people if pre-WWII. Audio explanations in English, Russian, and Latvian. Numerous photos and artifacts, even German film footage of the atrocities.
Eyal Yablonka (3 years ago)
Its a small museum. The main gallery exhibits Jewish life in Riga and Latvia before it was exterminated. The Holocaust exhibition in the next room is very moving. There is a read diary of a girl that describes her experiences during June and July 1941, just as the Germans entered. In only a few months about 90,000 Jews were murdered in Latvia.
Stef L (3 years ago)
This is an extremely informative but obviously deeply moving museum with free entry, complimentary multi-language audio guides and very welcoming staff. Well worth a visit.
Christiaan Vos (4 years ago)
Interesting and free museum about the history of the Jewish people in Latvia. Offers a lot of information and insight. The visit includes a free audio tour which is very elaborate. Would recommend.
Zoe Miniconi Bouhassira (4 years ago)
Impressive exhibition and important work. A must do if you feel you want to get a better sense the Jewish history in this country
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