The present Invermark Castle is on the site of a 14th-century castle. The castle belonged to the Lindsays of Crawford. It was designed to control Highland marauders. It was here that David Lindsay, 9th Earl of Crawford died in 1558. The present castle was built in the 16th century, and heightened in the early 17th century. The castle was abandoned in 1803.

The 16th-century castle was a three-storey structure, having a corbelled parapet and parapet walk. The additions were another storey and a garret, and a two-storey angle-tower. The castle walls have rounded corners. Two massive chimney-stacks have window-openings giving the garret light.

The entrance, at first floor level, was reached by a movable timber bridge or stair. The entrance, a rounded arch, which still has an iron yett, led to the hall, to which a small room is attached. A wheel stair was the only access to the vaulted basement. The turnpike stair by which access could be gained to the upper floors, which were also subdivided, no longer exists.

The entrance to the castle is barred and well above ground level, making the interior virtually inaccessible to visitors.

There are foundations of outbuildings to the east and south of the tower; material known to have been robbed from the site to build the parish church probably came from here.

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Loch Lee, United Kingdom
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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Vicky Dunbar (18 months ago)
Not very much to see at this site but it's on the way to Loch Lee which is worth the walk. There's no way inside amd all that's left is this one tower. Looks impressive from the roadside on approach though!
Joe Craig (2 years ago)
Lovely waks.
Joe Craig (2 years ago)
Lovely waks.
Sarah elder (3 years ago)
It's a building in Glen Esk. You can't do anything apart from look at it. It is very impressive and a wee bit romantic (if you're that way inclined I suppose) What you should be doing is enjoying the walk. Turn round and look at the very pretty horses in the field across from the castle.And then walk further and keep your eyes open for adders ( they're venomous so NO TOUCHING!) Have fun!
Sarah elder (3 years ago)
It's a building in Glen Esk. You can't do anything apart from look at it. It is very impressive and a wee bit romantic (if you're that way inclined I suppose) What you should be doing is enjoying the walk. Turn round and look at the very pretty horses in the field across from the castle.And then walk further and keep your eyes open for adders ( they're venomous so NO TOUCHING!) Have fun!
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