Dunninald has a history of at least a thousand years. The name is derived from the gaelic, dun a castle and ard, a high place. A second house was built about 1590, to replace the old tower. This was some four hundred yards inland and was at the foot of the present-day beech avenue, next to the walled garden.

By 1811 the second house was some 230 years old and the new owner, Peter Arkley, commissioned James Gillespie Graham to built a new house. This was designed by the architect James Gillespie Graham in the gothic revival style, building started in 1819 and the house was completed in 1824.

Guided tours of the castle explain the history of the house, the collections of furniture, paintings and displays of fine needlework photographs and memorabilia, examples of fine plasterwork and trompe l'oeil can also be seen. Tours take approximately 40 minutes and start on the hour and half hour.

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Address

Montrose, United Kingdom
See all sites in Montrose

Details

Founded: 1819-1824
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fidelma Cook (2 months ago)
Great tour of the Castle. Wonderful woodland walk afterwards and the gardens are beautiful. Lots of ideas there for the amateur gardener. And honey available from the hive there.
Mick Ryan (3 months ago)
Visited out of hours and walked the woodland and wall Garden which very well maintained and beautiful
Nick Tonge (14 months ago)
Lovely relaxing wall garden and grounds.
John Smith (16 months ago)
A hidden gem. Delightful woodland walks and walled gardens. Amazing bluebell woods, lots of rhododendrons, promise of lots of summer colour to come. Check website for opening times. £5 entrance but on Gardener's World 2 for 1 deal so remember your card..!
John & Shiona Smith (16 months ago)
A hidden gem. Delightful woodland walks and walled gardens. Amazing bluebell woods, lots of rhododendrons, promise of lots of summer colour to come. Check website for opening times. £5 entrance but on Gardener's World 2 for 1 deal so remember your card..!
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Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

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