The earliest structure on the site of Red Castle was built for King William the Lion in the late twelfth century to repel Viking invasions to Lunan Bay. Evidence shows, however, that William took up residence there on several occasions whilst on hunting expeditions. In 1194, William conferred the castle, and land surrounding the village of Inverkeilor, to Walter de Berkeley, the Great Chamberlain. On his death, his lands of Inverkeilor, with the castle, passed to Ingram de Balliol who had married the heiress of Walter. He rebuilt the castle and the property remained in that family for two generations. When his grandson, Ingram, who flourished between 1280-84, died childless about 1305 the property passed to the son of Constance de Baliol, Henry de Fishburn.

The property was forfeit during the reallocation by Robert the Bruce who in 1328 gave the castle to the Earl of Ross. The castle is referred to as rubeum castrum (Latin for Red Castle) in deeds of 1286, referring to its burnished red sandstone, typical of this area.

In 1579, James, son of Patrick Gray, 4th Lord Gray, married Lady Elizabeth Beaton, who owned the castle, and fell in love with her daughter. After Lady Beaton threw him out, Gray (with his brother Andrew of Dunninald) laid siege to the castle for two years, ultimately burning the inhabitants out. James VI ordered John Erskine of Dun and his son Robert to bring siege engines and eject Gray, with the help of the townspeople of Dundee. Erskine was asked to make an inventory of the goods in the castle and give safe conduct for Elizabeth Beaton's son, the poet John Stewart of Baldynneis to the king's presence.

In 1590 it was reported that 12,000 gold crowns had been landed in the creek near the castle to aid the Catholic cause in Scotland. The castle slipped into decline, and, although it remained partially roofed until 1770, it was never again a residence of nobility. Its last inhabitant was the minister of Inverkeilor, one James Rait.

Red Castle stands on high ground overlooking Lunan Bay, on the North Sea coast. Immediately to the north of Red Castle is the mouth of the Lunan Water, with the hamlet of Lunan beyond. Only a part of the fifteenth century rectangular tower, and the 2-metre thick east curtain wall remain. The tower in particular is in precipitous condition, being perched on the edge of the hill above Lunan Bay, and was described as being 'in imminent danger of collapse' in 1999. The castle is clearly visible from the A92 road and the Edinburgh to Aberdeen line. The remains are those of the 15th-century keep, and the surrounding wall, or enceinte, which may date from the 13th century. A midden below the castle is continually eroding, yielding a number of artefacts now in the Montrose Museum.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Antonio Fdez-Luna (2 years ago)
Unexpectedly beautiful and with superb hidden sights
Allan MacIver (2 years ago)
This is an amazing ruin to visit. We had walked the North end of Lunan Beach and then we carried on to visit the castle. The castle itself is ruinous and is fenced off but you can still get an appreciation of the size of the place. There is a path to follow although a big tree has fallen so there is a diversion and it is reasonably steep. Parking is very limited we were parked at the beach car park. Once you visit the castle there is another path to go and visit the south end of Lunan Beach which is what we did, it turned out to be a very good long walk.
Gordon McCrae (3 years ago)
Accessed through woods from the road, looks as though it may eventually fall to the river below, great views of Lunan beach.
Gary Forbes (3 years ago)
Loved the beach. Amazing place to visit
Harry McGinley (3 years ago)
Nice walk and views of Lunan Bay
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