St. Saviour's

Riga, Latvia

This little church commissioned by British traders living in Riga was built in 1857 on a shipload of English soil specially imported from the UK. Consecrated in 1859, the church was only full when British warships visited Latvia. Transformed into a student disco during Soviet times, it is once again a place of worship which is attended by Riga's English-speaking expat population. Its pastor and his dedicated flock are also renowned for their charitable works.

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Address

Anglikāņu iela 2a, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1857-1859
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

More Information

www.inyourpocket.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladimir G (18 months ago)
Impressive church
George On tour (2 years ago)
The congregation’s involvement in community outreach programs is a direct result of its history. In the early 19th century, British traders were active in the territory now known as Latvia, and British sailors were a common sight on the streets of Riga. On occasion, the sailors got into trouble and were incarcerated. Partly in response to this issue, British businessmen in 1806 established a British Poor Fund, whose purposes were threefold: 1) to provide temporary relief for distressed British subjects; 2) to endow a British clergyman to celebrate services according to the Rites of the Church of England; and 3) to build a church and residence for the clergyman. A congregation was founded in 1822, and the foundation stone of the church was laid in 1857. A shipload of earth was sent from Britain so that the church could be built on British soil. Bricks were provided as well. The church was dedicated on July 26 1859, as the Church of St. Saviour in Riga, and the first regular church service was held in November 1859. When in 1941 neighbouring St. Peter’s Lutheran Church was devastated its parish moved to St. Saviour’s and existed there for some time also during the Soviet period. From 1973, it became the home of the Riga Polytechnic Institute’s Student Club. During this period, the church building was renewed, and it became a cultural centre and venue for concerts, exhibitions, and dances.
artis jankavs (2 years ago)
It's a old one.... and nice
Dirk Bohrer (2 years ago)
Nice church which seems to have the real Christian attitude.
Sa Pr (2 years ago)
An active Anglican victorian gothic church, designed by the architect Johann Felsko. The foundation stone was laid in 1857 and the church was dedicated on 26 July 1859.
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