Hablingbo Church

Havdhem, Sweden

Hablingbo Church was made of sandstone. The tower was erected around the year 1200 and the Gothic-style main nave and choir were built in the 14th century. The sacristy was added in the 1730s.

The most interesting detail is a Lion Portal, originally the main entrance to the former 12th century Romanesque church. When the church was rebuilt in the 14th century, it was re-used in the north face of the nave. The story of Cain and Abel is well-known, but is not often seen in ecclesiastical art. The Lion Portal is one of the most prominent stone sculptures on Gotland.

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Address

520 Hablingbo, Havdhem, Sweden
See all sites in Havdhem

Details

Founded: ca. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.segotland.se

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristofer Olsson (9 months ago)
En speciell kyrka med den annorlunda norrporten eller lejonporten. Värt ett besök.
Christoffer Lindvall (10 months ago)
En vacker kyrka på landsbygden.
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