Burntisland Parish Church

Burntisland, United Kingdom

Burntisland Parish Church was constructed for the Church of Scotland in 1592. It is historically important as one of the first churches built in Scotland after the Reformation.

The building is notable for its square design: the interior is 18m square with four arched piers reaching in diagonally from the corners to form a 6m square in the centre. Various models for it have been suggested, mainly in the Low Countries, but no candidate has been found to predate it, and it is therefore probably an original Scottish design.

It incorporates a gallery with a separate exit, for sailors to leave the service when the timing of the tide dictated that it was time to sail.

The tower was rebuilt by Samuel Neilson in 1748. Significant renovations were carried out by David Vertue in 1822; he enlarged the windows and removed many of the old pews.

It is decorated inside with carved wooden panels, many of which relate to the town's maritime history, depicting ships, shipowners, and nautical trades. As well as sailors, there were also areas for the guilds of schoolmasters, tailors, hammermen, maltsters, and bakers. A painted panel in the west gallery from 1930 commemorates the 800th anniversary of the old church at Kirkton.

The 1606 Magistrate's Pew (formerly known as the Burntisland Castle Pew) in the northeast corner was built for Robert Melville of Rossend. In 1907 Robert Rowand Anderson supervised renovation of this and other parts of the interior. The bell was cast by Isobel Meikle in 1708. The organ was paid for by Fife-born industrialist Andrew Carnegie. The church was extensively renovated in the 1990s.

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Details

Founded: 1592
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elizabeth Kell (21 months ago)
I really hope this Church doesn't close. My ancestors are buried here and I visit every summer when the graveyard is open to the public. Very friendly and helpful guide. Love it.
Lesley Backhouse (2 years ago)
Great venue for coffee mornings and concerts
Boozytortoise (2 years ago)
The jesus gud
James Salmond (2 years ago)
Love this place...friendly people .
James Batchelor (3 years ago)
Amazing space. Really interesting history. Just wonderful. Visiting is a must.
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