Mains Castle castle consists of several buildings surrounding a courtyard, although several of the original western buildings no longer exist. The northern and eastern buildings are where the family would have lived, with the servants occupying the southern quarters. The castle also has a large, six-floor, square tower house with dressed cornerstones, which is typical of 16th-century construction.

The castle is located in Dundee's Caird Park to the north of the city overlooking the Dichty valley and adjacent to a small stream known as the Gelly Burn. On the opposite side of the burn is located the mausoleum of the Graham family and the Main's cemetery, which was formerly the site of the district's kirk.

The castle is believed to have been built in 1562 by Sir David Graham, nephew of Cardinal Beaton. A keystone in the western gateway bears this date as well as the initials DG and DMO for David Graham and Dame Margaret Ogilvy. A horizontal beam in one of the eastern courtyard doors bears a date of 1582, indicating a possible completion date. The castle was the seat of the Grahams of Fintry and remained so until the 19th century when Robert Graham of Fintry sold the lands to David Erskine, with the condition that his family could retain the territorial title of Graham of Fintry and that the estate revert to the older name of Lumlathen or Linlathen. The estate was later sold by Shipley Gordon Stuart Erskine to James Key Caird, who gifted the castle and its lands to the town council as a site for a public park in 1913. The park was later opened in 1923 by Caird's half sister Mrs. Marryat. The castle was renovated in the 1980s through a government scheme for the unemployed, as many of the buildings had become roofless.

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Founded: 1562
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sam Torrance (3 years ago)
Absolutely brilliant place .Great surroundings as well.Could easily forget your in a city
danny B (3 years ago)
Spent the night ghost hunting and then the morning taking in the sites. Nice building inside.
Michelle Millar (3 years ago)
Booked Mains Castle for my mums wake as we had fond memories of walking and playing around here when we were younger in the summer months. My mum claims she seen the Grey Lady once in the graveyard opposite. The layout of the room was lovely as was the food and drinks. Could not fault anything and we were not rushed to leave the premises. Dean and his wife are very friendly and nothing is too much trouble.
neil connell (3 years ago)
Great venue, nice staff. Brilliant for what we were using it for. Will def think about using it again.
RudeTek Sound System (3 years ago)
I was here during a music event but fell in love with the castle. It is just so beautiful inside out. The size from outside is misleading, as it's quite spacious inside and with a beautiful courtyard where a majestic tree sits in the middle. Definitely worth having or participating in an event here. It's quite the experience and will definitely come back.
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