Loviisa Fortress

Loviisa, Finland

After the Sweden's defeat in Russo-Swedish War 1741-1743 (also known as the Hats' Russian War) eastern border of Finland was moved to west. Important fortresses of Hamina, Lappeenranta and Savonlinna were left to Russian side of border.

The city of Loviisa was established in 1745 to handle a international commerce in Finland. Planning of the new fortification system started concurrently, because Loviisa was located alongside the strategic road from Vyborg to Turku. The parliament accepted the plan of twin fortresses in 1747: one in Loviisa city to protect the road and another to Svartholma island to defence Loviisa from the sea. Building of the Loviisa fortress started in 1748, but the plans were never completed. The ground was too muddy for heavy stone walls and the Crown had continuous lack of money. Building was interrupted in 1757 and the king Gustav III ordered to stop the construction permanently in 1775. Loviisa fortress didn't see any battle. In the Finnish War 1808-1809 it surrended to Russians without fighting, because people of Loviisa were afraid of the destruction of the city.

Nowadays there remains two completed bastions, Rosen and Ungern. Renovation started in the 1960's and Ungern is mostly renovated. Rosen is still uncompleted and mostly ruined.

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Address

Ungernintie, Loviisa, Finland
See all sites in Loviisa

Details

Founded: 1748-1757
Category: Castles and fortifications in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.muuka.com

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaana Joenvuori (9 months ago)
Great historical area in Loviisa, surrounded by a beautiful park The bastion fortress is open to public all year. The construction of the bastion fortress was started in 1748, but was interrupted in 1757 because the Swedes, the rulers of the time in Finland, were in war. In summertime the nature in the area is wonderful. There are also a lot of flower and shrub palntings. There are signposts that explain the history of Loviisa and the fortress. You can follow the signposts and see the whole area.
Marika Vuolle (10 months ago)
Beautiful area and takes your thoughts to the heart of history.
Ranjeet Naik (13 months ago)
One of the well maintained fortress, worth to visit.
firas albayati (13 months ago)
A good place for history lovers and a beautiful walking area
Aki-Janne Koivisto (3 years ago)
Ungern's splendor, Rosen badly suffered. However, they are very close to each other, making it easy to get to know both at the same time.
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