Loviisa Old Town

Loviisa, Finland

The city of Loviisa was founded in 1745, as a border fortress against Russia. It is named after Lovisa Ulrika, the Swedish Queen consort of Adolf Frederick of Sweden. The old town survived from the great fire in 1855 and is today one of the most vell-preserved wooden towns in Finland.
Narrow sandstone and cobblestone streets and small wooden cottages provide fashionable sights for visitors.

The sea stretches all the way to the town centre. The Laivasilta area is related to the region's sailing history and is characterised by its red salt warehouses, making it a popular area for meetings and events durin summers.

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Details

Founded: 18th-19th centuries
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.loviisa.fi

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