Loviisa Old Town

Loviisa, Finland

The city of Loviisa was founded in 1745, as a border fortress against Russia. It is named after Lovisa Ulrika, the Swedish Queen consort of Adolf Frederick of Sweden. The old town survived from the great fire in 1855 and is today one of the most vell-preserved wooden towns in Finland.
Narrow sandstone and cobblestone streets and small wooden cottages provide fashionable sights for visitors.

The sea stretches all the way to the town centre. The Laivasilta area is related to the region's sailing history and is characterised by its red salt warehouses, making it a popular area for meetings and events durin summers.

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Details

Founded: 18th-19th centuries
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

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www.loviisa.fi

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The Church of the Holy Cross

The church of the former Franciscan monastery was built probably between 1515 and 1520. It is located in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Old Rauma. The church stands by the small stream of Raumanjoki (Rauma river).

The exact age of the Church of the Holy Cross is unknown, but it was built to serve as the monastery church of the Rauma Franciscan Friary. The monastery had been established in the early 15th century and a wooden church was built on this location around the year 1420.

The Church of the Holy Cross served the monastery until 1538, when it was abandoned for a hundred years as the Franciscan friary was disbanded in the Swedish Reformation. The church was re-established as a Lutheran church in 1640, when the nearby Church of the Holy Trinity was destroyed by fire.

The choir of the two-aisle grey granite church features medieval murals and frescoes. The white steeple of the church was built in 1816 and has served as a landmark for seafarers.