Svartholma Fortress

Loviisa, Finland

Svartholma sea fortress was built by Swedish in the 18th century. Svartholma and near Loviisa land fortress were designated to defence strategic road from Turku tu Viborg and Sweden-Finland's eastern border against Russians. Svartholma construction started in 1748 and it was mostly completed in the 1760's. Svartholma was a typical bastion system including four bastions and an outer fortification.

Svartholma played an significant role in Russo-Swedish War 1788-1790. It was a naval stronghold for the Swedish fleet when it defeated Russians in Ruotsinsalmi battle. In the Finnish War (1808-1809) Svartholma was first time attacked by eastern enemies. The Russian artillery fired sporadically at the fortress, but no serious damage was inflicted. However, the Swedish officers, led by Carl Magnus Gripenberg decided to capitulate the fortress, almost without a fight on March 18, 1808.

Svartholma lost its strategical importance during the Russian period. It was used partly as a military base, and partly as a prison for Finnish prisoners. The empty fortress was largely destroyed by the British during the Crimean War (1855).

The Finnish National Board of Antiquities were restoring the fortress since the 1960s, and the work was finally ready in 1998. Today Svartholma is a popular tourist attraction with a museum and guided walking tours. It's possible to visit there by ferry-boat in summer time.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Loviisa, Finland
See all sites in Loviisa

Details

Founded: 1748-1770
Category: Castles and fortifications in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Victor Dahlberg (10 months ago)
Nya restaurangen är inte den bästa (juli 2018) men fästningen är värd en titt
Sami Saarinen (11 months ago)
Vanhan merilinnoituksen rauniot Loviisan kaupungin edustalla, joka on valmistuttuaan ollut vaikuttavan näköinen rakennelma. Valitettavasti englantilaiset räjäyttivät linnoituksessa olleet majoitustilat, joten nykyään nähtävillä ovat ainoastaan ehjänä säilyneet linnoituksen muurit. Kesäaikaan linnoituksessa lapsilla on mahdollista osallistua miellyttävään interaktiivinen seikkailuun, josta ainakin oma jälkikasvuni piti kovasti.
Emil Svartström (11 months ago)
1700-luvun monikäyttölinnake Suomenlinnan suunnittelijan kynästä. Toiminut puolustuslinnakkeena ja vankilana. Nykyään sitten museona. Museo ilmainen, opastettu kierros on maskullinen. Linnakkeeseen pääsee monesta paikasta sisällekin katsomaan. Saarrella ravintola. Lauttamatka saarelle maksaa melkein pari kymppiä. Oma vene voi siis olla järkevä.
Tobias Ohls (12 months ago)
Casper Carlsson (12 months ago)
Lastenannokset sikahintaan..
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Church of the Savior on Blood

The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood is one of the main sights of St. Petersburg. The church was built on the site where Tsar Alexander II was assassinated and was dedicated in his memory. Construction began in 1883 under Alexander III, as a memorial to his father, Alexander II. Work progressed slowly and was finally completed during the reign of Nicholas II in 1907. Funding was provided by the Imperial family with the support of many private donors.

Architecturally, the Cathedral differs from St. Petersburg's other structures. The city's architecture is predominantly Baroque and Neoclassical, but the Savior on Blood harks back to medieval Russian architecture in the spirit of romantic nationalism. It intentionally resembles the 17th-century Yaroslavl churches and the celebrated St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow.

The Church contains over 7500 square metres of mosaics — according to its restorers, more than any other church in the world. The interior was designed by some of the most celebrated Russian artists of the day — including Viktor Vasnetsov, Mikhail Nesterov and Mikhail Vrubel — but the church's chief architect, Alfred Alexandrovich Parland, was relatively little-known (born in St. Petersburg in 1842 in a Baltic-German Lutheran family). Perhaps not surprisingly, the Church's construction ran well over budget, having been estimated at 3.6 million roubles but ending up costing over 4.6 million. The walls and ceilings inside the Church are completely covered in intricately detailed mosaics — the main pictures being biblical scenes or figures — but with very fine patterned borders setting off each picture.

In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the church was ransacked and looted, badly damaging its interior. The Soviet government closed the church in the early 1930s. During the Second World War when many people were starving due to the Siege of Leningrad by Nazi German military forces, the church was used as a temporary morgue for those who died in combat and from starvation and illness. The church suffered significant damage. After the war, it was used as a warehouse for vegetables, leading to the sardonic name of Saviour on Potatoes.

In July 1970, management of the Church passed to Saint Isaac's Cathedral (then used as a highly profitable museum) and proceeds from the Cathedral were funneled back into restoring the Church. It was reopened in August 1997, after 27 years of restoration, but has not been reconsecrated and does not function as a full-time place of worship; it is a Museum of Mosaics. Even before the Revolution it never functioned as a public place of worship; having been dedicated exclusively to the memory of the assassinated tsar, the only services were panikhidas (memorial services). The Church is now one of the main tourist attractions in St. Petersburg.