Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

Łódź, Poland

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox church located in the city of Łódź. It was built during the period when Poland was part of the Russian Empire. It was constructed with the financial support from the local textile factory owners and the most prominent citizens who adhered to Judaism, Protestantism and Catholicism. The church was consecrated on 29 May 1884 by Archbishop Leontius the ordinary of Warsaw and Chełm Dioceses.

The orthodox church was designed and built in the Neo-Byzantine style in an octagonal shape. Stained glass windows and iconostasis, made from oak wood, with three doors are the main decorations of the church. Izrael Poznański, who financed the enclosure and fence around the church was also the founder of the iconostasis.

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Details

Founded: 1884
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giga Xachidze (6 months ago)
GOOD
Quirke Dental Surgeons (13 months ago)
Looks wonderful from outside but could not determine when it might be possible to see inside.
Václav Nývlt (14 months ago)
Church behind fence with closed gate, surrounded by parking lot. Oups ...
Halime Nur Saman (2 years ago)
The most colorful church in Lodz. Others are more gothic and dark. But this is interesting. Beautiful!
Halime Nur Saman (2 years ago)
The most colorful church in Lodz. Others are more gothic and dark. But this is interesting. Beautiful!
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