Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

Łódź, Poland

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox church located in the city of Łódź. It was built during the period when Poland was part of the Russian Empire. It was constructed with the financial support from the local textile factory owners and the most prominent citizens who adhered to Judaism, Protestantism and Catholicism. The church was consecrated on 29 May 1884 by Archbishop Leontius the ordinary of Warsaw and Chełm Dioceses.

The orthodox church was designed and built in the Neo-Byzantine style in an octagonal shape. Stained glass windows and iconostasis, made from oak wood, with three doors are the main decorations of the church. Izrael Poznański, who financed the enclosure and fence around the church was also the founder of the iconostasis.

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Details

Founded: 1884
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Halime Nur Saman (5 months ago)
The most colorful church in Lodz. Others are more gothic and dark. But this is interesting. Beautiful!
Craig Parkinson (13 months ago)
A great example of Orthadox architecture.
Ufuk Coskunsu (20 months ago)
Amaazing placee.:)))
Dariusz Panasiuk (4 years ago)
Very interesting architecture. Russian orthodox church you haven't seen before
Mazen Abou Mrad (4 years ago)
Classical Greek Orthodox church (Russian style). The community and Pop are welcoming.
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