Oporów Castle

Oporów, Poland

Oporów Castle is built of bricks in the Gothic architectural style in between 1434–1449 in the village of Oporów  The castle was raised by the Deputy Chancellor of Poland (1429-1434), and highly regarded religious leader Władysław Oporowski.

The first wooden stronghold located in Oporów was recorded in the fourteenth century. The castle is said to have been raised by Mikołaj Oporowski and his son Władysław Oporowski, a highly regarded political and religious leader in the Kingdom of Poland, which in 1428 took on the estate as his own. Up until the eighteenth century the castle was owned by several families: House of Sołołobów, Korzeniowski, Pociejów and the House Oborski. The residence had only once ever been hit by any sort of devastation - in 1657 the castle's top levels caught fire - however, all of the castle was reconstructed. In 1930 the castle was transferred to the Society of the Credit of Land in Warsaw (Polish: Towarzystwo Kredytowe Ziemskie w Warszawie). After World War II the castle was nationalised and reconstructed. In 1949 the castle began housing a museum.

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Oporów, Poland
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Founded: 1434-1449
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mr RW (11 months ago)
Nice place in the middle of nothing. In winter looks especially charming as hunted house with many black birds in the park. Great !!
W RR (15 months ago)
Prime medieval castle off the track in pretty park
W RR (15 months ago)
Prime medieval castle off the track in pretty park
Muhammad Mahfuzur Rahman (16 months ago)
A little nice castle out of nowhere. About one and half hours drive from Warsaw. The 14th century main building is very nicely maintained. Red brick facade, Gothic-styled roof and parapet, narrow strip of water-body around the plinth, and a large forest like park around the castle make the area stunning. There is not much to do here other than seeing some exhibits inside the castle. Some furniture and paintings are nice. It would have been better if there could be something more either in the park or around the complex to make it more feasible for the tourists to spend a day or half.
Muhammad Mahfuzur Rahman (16 months ago)
A little nice castle out of nowhere. About one and half hours drive from Warsaw. The 14th century main building is very nicely maintained. Red brick facade, Gothic-styled roof and parapet, narrow strip of water-body around the plinth, and a large forest like park around the castle make the area stunning. There is not much to do here other than seeing some exhibits inside the castle. Some furniture and paintings are nice. It would have been better if there could be something more either in the park or around the complex to make it more feasible for the tourists to spend a day or half.
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