Jewish Cemetery

Łódź, Poland

The Łódź Jewish Cemetery, also known as the New Jewish Cemetery, was once the largest Jewish cemetery in Poland and one of the largest in the world. The necropolis was opened in 1892 and occupies around 44 hectares of land. The cemetery contains from 180,000 to 230,000 marked graves, as well as mass graves of victims of the Litzmannstadt Ghetto and the Holocaust. From 1893 to 1896, the basic construction of the necropolis was completed under the supervision of well-known architect Adolf Zeligson.

The circular access is provided by the gate from the southern side on the axis of Abram Cukier Street, which is an extension Chryzantem Street. Pedestrian access is possible from the east through a gate in the wall stretching along Zmienna Street. The composition of the foundation is based on the arrangement of two mutually perpendicular axes. The first one leads from the main gate to the square in front of the pre-funeral house. Alongside it, there were once buildings associated with the functioning of the necropolis, in addition to the pre-burial house, this complex included a synagogue, a residential house for cemetery service, a water tower, a mikveh and other minor construction facilities.

Today over a hundred of historical gravesites have been declared historical monuments and are in various stages of restoration. The mausoleum of Izrael Poznański is perhaps the largest Jewish tombstone in the world and the only one containing decorative mosaic.

The cemetery continues to function as a Jewish burial site.

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Address

Zmienna 40, Łódź, Poland
See all sites in Łódź

Details

Founded: 1892
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Odds and Ends (7 months ago)
Disappointed it said on the website it was open but when I arrived it was closed and every time I rang the office just got a buzzing sound
Mia (8 months ago)
Ticket office ať the entrance od the cementary??!! Seriously? It was the biggest shock I got in the Poland!
Pablo P (15 months ago)
It's definitely a must see if you're visiting Lodz or this area of Poland. It's not only a reminder of a dark period in Europe's history, but it also helps in visualizing Poland's history of diversity. The cemetery is quite big (and overgrown) so give yourself some time to explore and reflect. The Poznanski mausoleum is something out of this world, but the different symbolism on other tombstones is also intriguing for those unfamiliar with Jewish traditions.
Wojtek Lazarowicz (2 years ago)
Niesamowite miejsce Astonishing place, giving unique perspective on history of Polish Jews
Lucyna Iciek (3 years ago)
You should visit this place if You are in Lodz. You can better understand there why Lodz is called a town of four cultures, as well as appreciate life, what we have now and why we should never forget war is the most tragic evidence of what people do to others
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