Brzeg Town Hall

Brzeg, Poland

Brzeg Town Hall is a Renaissance building designed by Bernard Niuron built between 1569 and 1577. It is considered to be one of the most important Renaissance monuments in Poland. In addition to its role as the seat of the municipal government of Brzeg, the building houses several other institutions.

The first building housing the municipal government in Brzeg already existed in the 14th century but was burned down in the town's great fire during the reign of George II of Brieg. The present town hall was built between 1569 and 1577. It was designed by the Italian architect Bernardo Niuron, assisted by the Italian builder Jakub Parr. In later years, the building underwent minor alterations in some of its rooms which were adapted for administrative purposes. In 1926, a Renaissance gate, from one of the Brzeg townhouses, was added to the southern façade.

The town hall is a Renaissance structure built in the town square, surrounded by an inner courtyard of townhouses. It has two storeys and a saddle roof. The most interesting part of the building is its western side. In the corner there are two quadrangular towers with tented roofs and roof lanterns. Between them spans a five-axis loggia, with semicircular arches on the ground floor. Over the loggia there is another level with windows which are separated by a cornice from the mansard roof. Fragments of the façade are covered with sgraffito decorations from the seventeenth-century. There is a four-sided central tower with an octagonal cupola topped with a balustrade and two roof lanterns. The interiors have been preserved with halls and corridors of the original design, most notably the Hall of Councillors with its wall paintings and fine ceiling.

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Address

Rynek 1, Brzeg, Poland
See all sites in Brzeg

Details

Founded: 1569-1577
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jurij Wrembiak (2 years ago)
A shabby building that is falling apart and haunted, illuminated with the money of the residents. What mayor, such an office.
Tomasz Wierzbicki (2 years ago)
Massacre of working hours as for the unemployed, retired grandparents or drunkards on benefits ???? The NORMAL office is open until 6 p.m. once a week, which is the minimum. And this one is open until 4:15 p.m. miracle for a very long time ????? The office is to serve the citizens !!!!!
Mariusz BonQ (2 years ago)
The officials do not accept applicants, they only help to fill in the documents over the phone - they are afraid of C19.
Jot En (3 years ago)
On the sidewalks and streets there are obstacles, potholes, potholes, no bicycle paths. The vast majority of towns of this type used EU funds to improve, unfortunately there is a drama here.
Artur M (3 years ago)
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