Brzeg Town Hall

Brzeg, Poland

Brzeg Town Hall is a Renaissance building designed by Bernard Niuron built between 1569 and 1577. It is considered to be one of the most important Renaissance monuments in Poland. In addition to its role as the seat of the municipal government of Brzeg, the building houses several other institutions.

The first building housing the municipal government in Brzeg already existed in the 14th century but was burned down in the town's great fire during the reign of George II of Brieg. The present town hall was built between 1569 and 1577. It was designed by the Italian architect Bernardo Niuron, assisted by the Italian builder Jakub Parr. In later years, the building underwent minor alterations in some of its rooms which were adapted for administrative purposes. In 1926, a Renaissance gate, from one of the Brzeg townhouses, was added to the southern façade.

The town hall is a Renaissance structure built in the town square, surrounded by an inner courtyard of townhouses. It has two storeys and a saddle roof. The most interesting part of the building is its western side. In the corner there are two quadrangular towers with tented roofs and roof lanterns. Between them spans a five-axis loggia, with semicircular arches on the ground floor. Over the loggia there is another level with windows which are separated by a cornice from the mansard roof. Fragments of the façade are covered with sgraffito decorations from the seventeenth-century. There is a four-sided central tower with an octagonal cupola topped with a balustrade and two roof lanterns. The interiors have been preserved with halls and corridors of the original design, most notably the Hall of Councillors with its wall paintings and fine ceiling.

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Address

Rynek 1, Brzeg, Poland
See all sites in Brzeg

Details

Founded: 1569-1577
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iwona Wojtaszczyk (15 months ago)
Very professional and very nice service in the ID card department. Thank you again.
Wacław Dempniak (15 months ago)
Very friendly office just why such queues to the cash register in tax matters
Paweł Solski (2 years ago)
Jest ok.
Alicja Szabat (3 years ago)
Mieszkałam już w kilku miastach i muszę z czystą przyjemnością stwierdzić, że w Brzegu jest najmilsza obsługa jaką człowiek może sobie wymarzyć. Pracownicy mili i pomocni. Wielu rzeczy się po prostu nie wie a dzięki Paniom z brzeskiego urzędu bardzo dużo się dowiedzieliśmy i zyskaliśmy na czasie w wielu kwestiach. Kiedy przyszło nam się wyprowadzać, ubolewaliśmy nie tylko dlatego że przestajemy być mieszkańcami przyjemnego miasteczka, ale też właśnie dlatego, że do Urzędu szło się po prostu z uśmiechem na ustach. Pozdrawiamy wszystkich pracowników życząc miłej pracy !
Jacek Kordas (3 years ago)
Wydział komunikacji PORAŻKA. Nie ma burmistrza w tym mieście. BAŁAGAN na własnym podwórku przedstawia wizerunek pracy urzędu miasta. Szczegóły umieściłem w swoim komentarzu opiniujacym starostwo powiatowe w Brzegu.
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