Saint Symphorien's Church

Azay-le-Rideau, France

The church dedicated to Saint Symphorien near the Azay-le-Rideau château that is interesting for the number of architectural periods incorporated in its design. While the newest portion dates from 1603, the current façade incorporates an older 9th century façade in the Carolingian style. The original carved figures are still visible, though an added window destroyed part of the second row. The rest of the church is of a Romanesque style. It was built in 1518 and 1527.

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Details

Founded: 9th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sgrignola (2 years ago)
Piccina ma carina! Vista solo dall'esterno.
Maxime Ker (2 years ago)
Très belle église de l. Extérieur car ns n avons pas pu rentrer car fermé
Enrico Gorini (3 years ago)
Raro esempio di chiesa a due navate e due facciate, la facciata di sinistra in stile tardo-gotico, quella di destra con raffigurazioni scolpite romaniche. Interno pieno di misticismo, arricchito anche da musiche religiose rinascimentali
Loim Hen (3 years ago)
Beau clocher et portail. Intérieur sans intérêt.
gratou mam (4 years ago)
Très belle église avec vitraux originaux
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