Megginch Castle is a 15th-century castle in Perth and Kinross. It was the family home of Cherry Drummond, 16th Baroness Strange. Megginch Castle is a private family home, which is only open for special events. The gardens are home to trees such as ancient yews, there is a topiary, and in the spring there is an extensive display of daffodils. The orchard contains two National Plant Collections of Scottish apples, and pears, and cider apples. The gardens are listed on the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland. The Gardens are open once a year under the Scotland's Gardens Scheme.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bacchus de Magenta (11 months ago)
A real hidden gem !! To be absolutely discovered An authentic experience
Ali Abercrombie (13 months ago)
amazing place
Sandra Taylor (15 months ago)
Wonderful afternoon at this beautiful house and grounds. listening to the Inspirational orchestra. Truly a gorgeous setting .
Iain Anderson (16 months ago)
Lovely place
Sandra Fleming (2 years ago)
Beautiful family home. Lovely walled garden
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