Blois Cathedral

Blois, France

Blois Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Louis de Blois) is a Roman Catholic cathedral, and a national monument of France, in Blois. It is the seat of the Bishopric of Blois, established in 1697.

This was previously the collegiate church of Saint-Solenne, the original building of which dated from the 12th century. Apart from some traces in the crypt nothing survives of this. The façade and the bell tower were built in 1544. The nave was destroyed by a hurricane in 1678, and the reconstruction in Gothic style took place between 1680 and 1700 under the architect Arnoult-Séraphin Poictevin (d. 1720). The Lady Chapel by the architect Jules Potier de la Morandière was added in about 1860.

To celebrate the church's elevation to a cathedral in 1697, Louis XIV presented the organ loft in 1704. The new see thereupon took the dedication to Saint Louis.

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Pour Saint-Louis, Blois, France
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Details

Founded: 1697
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yaron Bental (8 months ago)
Beautiful view quite
royal panda (2 years ago)
The only way i can describe this place is amazing and absolutely breathtaking it looks already massive on the outside and then tou go in and its a great scale to show how small a person actually is.
royal panda (2 years ago)
The only way i can describe this place is amazing and absolutely breathtaking it looks already massive on the outside and then tou go in and its a great scale to show how small a person actually is.
Adrian Otoiu (2 years ago)
While not the most impressive chateau seen fro the outside, as it stands in the middle of the town, the Royal Court of Blois is still a stunning presence when seen from the back. It is only when one gets inside the court that the scale of the building becomes visible. The famous double-helix staircase is a feat of ingenuous engineering and it take a bit of testing, of clumbing it up and down, to comprehend the way it juggles with our perceptions of space. The chambers and halls are somptuous, the text guidance is fairly good. The most captivating bits of French history related to this royal residence are thoroughly illustrated
Adrian Otoiu (2 years ago)
While not the most impressive chateau seen fro the outside, as it stands in the middle of the town, the Royal Court of Blois is still a stunning presence when seen from the back. It is only when one gets inside the court that the scale of the building becomes visible. The famous double-helix staircase is a feat of ingenuous engineering and it take a bit of testing, of clumbing it up and down, to comprehend the way it juggles with our perceptions of space. The chambers and halls are somptuous, the text guidance is fairly good. The most captivating bits of French history related to this royal residence are thoroughly illustrated
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