Blois Cathedral

Blois, France

Blois Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Louis de Blois) is a Roman Catholic cathedral, and a national monument of France, in Blois. It is the seat of the Bishopric of Blois, established in 1697.

This was previously the collegiate church of Saint-Solenne, the original building of which dated from the 12th century. Apart from some traces in the crypt nothing survives of this. The façade and the bell tower were built in 1544. The nave was destroyed by a hurricane in 1678, and the reconstruction in Gothic style took place between 1680 and 1700 under the architect Arnoult-Séraphin Poictevin (d. 1720). The Lady Chapel by the architect Jules Potier de la Morandière was added in about 1860.

To celebrate the church's elevation to a cathedral in 1697, Louis XIV presented the organ loft in 1704. The new see thereupon took the dedication to Saint Louis.

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Address

Pour Saint-Louis, Blois, France
See all sites in Blois

Details

Founded: 1697
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The Retirees (44 days ago)
Impressive cathedral. Definitely take the Lesley that explains the symbolism of the windows. Really informative and brings what are fairly dull windows into a whole new light & meaning. Definitely worth a visit if you're in Blois.
Juan Bribiesca Ruiz (44 days ago)
Beautiful
Dnz Slck (2 months ago)
So good...
Erik Jan van den Heuvel (7 months ago)
Not very special
Sean Rollins (2 years ago)
A nice church to walk through, although nothing about it really sets it apart from most of the others in France, so while pretty, definitely not worth a special trip.
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