Newbattle Abbey was founded in 1140 by monks from Melrose Abbey. The abbey was burned by English royal forces in 1385 and once more in 1544. It became a secular lordship for the last commendator, Mark Kerr in 1587.

After the Reformation most of the remains of the Abbey church were removed and used to build a new church. Little is known about the Newbattle church built after the Reformation. It was situated somewhere on the other side of Newbattle Road from the present church.

In 1720, the building was in such a poor state of repair that the minister, the Rev. Charles Campbell, thought it would possibly fall down. In September 1725, the Marquess of Lothian presented plans for a new church to Dalkeith Presbytery and the heritors (landowners). Edinburgh architect Mr Alexander McGill had drawn up these plans, and, although the project was approved, work did not commence on the new building, and on a clean site, until 1727. The design included making use of material from the old Church, where suitable, in the construction. In fact a considerable amount of stonework was transferred, to such an extent that all that remained of the old Church was the Crypt, which remained as the Burial Chamber for the Kerr/Lothian family. The completion year is generally accepted as 1729.

Part of the abbey was converted into a house which survives at the core of the current building. The house incorporates part of the south end of the monastic range, with the dorter undercroft intact.

The house was modified and rebuilt successively by John Mylne in 1650, William Burn in 1836 and David Bryce in 1858. The drawing room represents one of Scotland's greatest rooms, decorated by Thomas Bonnar around 1870. The 19th century chapel was created in a vaulted undercroft that may date from the original abbey buildings. The chapel includes a 16th-century font and a fine parquet floor, made using wood from the estate, in the style of original tile-work. The library is oak-lined and features a 17th-century moulded ceiling. The garden to the rear of the house includes a pair of large octagonal 17th century sundials. The main abbey remains lie buried to the west and north of the original house.

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Dalkeith, United Kingdom
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Founded: 1729
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Robert Philip (4 months ago)
Lovely place spoiled by people with unruly dogs.
Kirsty Blundell (4 months ago)
Brilliant place to go. And learn and be yourself.
Neil Baker (5 months ago)
The grounds and the forest adjoining are perfect for a nice circular walk, although make sure you bring walking shoes if it's been raining.
Lisa Paris (6 months ago)
Beautiful walk around Lord Ancrum woods , absolutely stunning place. The Rangers do an amazing job to keep the place looking fab ❤
evelyn lyall (6 months ago)
Lovely grounds to sit and enjoy the surrounding gardens, house and river . Circular walk suitable for able walkers, enjoyed by dog walkers and families out walking with pushchairs. Part of the wood decorated with fairy doors and "mystical things" for children to enjoy. A very nice way to spend a couple of hours.
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