San Miguel de Lillo Church

Oviedo, Spain

St. Michael of Lillo is a Roman Catholic church built on the Naranco mount, near the Church of Santa María del Naranco. It was completed in 842 and it was consecrated by Ramiro I of Asturias and his wife Paterna in the year 848. It was originally dedicated to St. Mary until this worship passed to the nearby palace in the 12th century, leaving this church dedicated to Saint Michael. It has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985.

It originally had a basilica ground plan, three aisles with a barrel vault, although part of the original structure has disappeared as the building collapsed during the 12th or 13th century. Nowadays, it conserves its western half from that period, together with several elements in the rest of the church such as the fantastic jambs in the vestibule or the extraordinary lattice on the window of the southern wall, sculpted from one single piece of stone.

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Address

Lugar Lillo 1, Oviedo, Spain
See all sites in Oviedo

Details

Founded: 842 AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paloma Fenor (16 months ago)
Just beautiful!
Rhea Thoppil (17 months ago)
Beautiful!
Yuri Perez (17 months ago)
Very well preserved pre-Romanic church. A specialist-guided tour is available in Spanish every half an hour or so, for €4/ adult and £3/ child. The tour is provided along with that of Santa Maria del Naranco. The guide will walk you through architectural, historical nuances in detail. Very interesting
Rob Carter (19 months ago)
One word. Beautiful. A must visit. Go early
Angelo Vassallo (2 years ago)
Other roman church in good shape
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