Church of Santa María de Bendones

Bendones, Spain

Santa María de Bendones is an Asturian Pre-Romanesque Roman Catholic church situated in Bendones, Spain, build between 792 and 842.

The structure is similar to the church of San Julián de los Prados, although the ground plan is not the typical basilica of the Pre-Romanesque churches, but has three enclosures at the western end, the central one as an entrance vestibule and two side areas possibly to house parishioners or ecclesiastics. This entrance leads into a single nave with a wooden ceiling, the same length as the entrance enclosures. The nave adjoins two rectangular side areas, also with a wooden ceiling, whose use seems to associated with the liturgical rites of the period. this nave joined with the sanctuary by three semicircular brick arches, each of which leads into its corresponding chapel, of which only the main or central one is covered with a brick barrel vault, the other two with wooden ceilings.

Above the main chapel is the 'typical' chamber, only accessible from outside, through a trefoil window with the standard Pre-Romanesque features; central arch larger than the side ones, resting on two free-standing capitals with rope moulding, and the upper rectangle framed by simple moulding.

Independent from the church structure, though close to its southern facade, stands the bell tower, on a rectangular ground plan.

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Details

Founded: 792-842 AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva García (2 months ago)
Beautiful Asturian Pre-Romanesque church, in an incomparable setting
Ismael Velez (2 months ago)
The best the landscape, the church was pre-Romanesque, but it was left in the war and rebuilt ... it is not the same
Toni del Río (2 months ago)
Pre-Romanesque church, destroyed during the Civil War and rebuilt in the 1950s. A good initiative, of course, its recovery, but I have been very disappointed, especially the latticework on the windows. They seem prefabricated, like those on the enclosures of some private gardens. I did not have the opportunity to know her inside.
Pisadiel (2 months ago)
Church of Santa María de Bendones (9th century), in Bendones (Uviéu, Asturies). Pre-Romanesque Church of pp. s. IX, from the time of King Alfonso II d'Asturies (783 / 791-842), following the formal aesthetics of Santullano. Perhaps linked to a family monastery. Of course, as a result of the civil war it suffered fire (1936) and destruction due to the action of the 'uncontrolled' hordes, with which it partially collapsed until the historian Carbayón Joaquín Manzanares Rodríguez-Mir (1922-2003), secretary of the Provincial Monuments Commission (1952-61) rescued it from oblivion in 1954 and after 4 years of restoration and / or reconstruction by the Carbayón architect Luis Menéndez Pidal (1896-1975) it regained its status. Single nave and transept, straight tripartite apse, with supra-apsidial chamber, portico and free-standing rectangular bell tower, slightly rebuilt up to about 5 m. Another jewel of Asturian pre-Romanesque, not so well known.
Carlos Vila (5 months ago)
The hermitage and the place where it is is very beautiful
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