Château de Tours

Tours, France

The Château de Tours was built in the 11th century. The building displayed an architecture of the Carolingian period, and was the residence of the Lords of France. Until the 2000s, the Royal Castle of Tours was used as an aquarium where about 1,500 fish of 200 different species could be seen. It also served as Grévin museum. The castle was classified as monument historique on 20 August 1913.

Currently, the building houses contemporary exhibitions of paintings and photographs, including works by Joan Miró, Daniel Buren,Nadar, and the workshop of Tours history where archaeological and historical documents, models, audio-visual films on the history of Tours, etc, are shown.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lisa Taverna (23 months ago)
Great art expositions! Always!
Christa Beschnitt (2 years ago)
Exhibitions of Andrė Kertesz, Jean Fourton
Christa Beschnitt (2 years ago)
Exhibitions of Andrė Kertesz, Jean Fourton
Pierre Levionnois (2 years ago)
Average food quality. Good Water tho
Pierre Levionnois (2 years ago)
Average food quality. Good Water tho
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