Château de Tours

Tours, France

The Château de Tours was built in the 11th century. The building displayed an architecture of the Carolingian period, and was the residence of the Lords of France. Until the 2000s, the Royal Castle of Tours was used as an aquarium where about 1,500 fish of 200 different species could be seen. It also served as Grévin museum. The castle was classified as monument historique on 20 August 1913.

Currently, the building houses contemporary exhibitions of paintings and photographs, including works by Joan Miró, Daniel Buren,Nadar, and the workshop of Tours history where archaeological and historical documents, models, audio-visual films on the history of Tours, etc, are shown.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Douglas Wong (2 months ago)
Beautiful chateau used for art exhibitions.
Attila Tényi (5 months ago)
Beautiful little castle with two round bastions. Little among the great Loire valley castles. Looks like a good family home.
iam Effortless (6 months ago)
I absolutely loved this town. Locals I chatted with seemed very friendly. Has a old town vibe still. Good food and drink places. Cool sights to see. North tours has a nice bridge to walk over. NOT AN UBER OR LYFT FRIENDLY city. Cabs suck and frequently didn't show up after requesting a ride with them. Used public transit and walked a lot, so prepare yourself for that if you plan on visiting.
Mark Playle (8 months ago)
A wonderful place to visit. Lots of great exhibitions
Ayesha Ahmad (11 months ago)
It's one of the places you would go to if only you are a tourist or interested in history. However, it is not always a disappointment as you various exhibitions going on here that well curated. Parking is easy to find here except in the evenings of weekends. Entry is free on first Sunday. On Mondays the castle remains closed.
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