Church of St. Julien

Tours, France

This 13th century church was built on the site of an earlier building – a church dating from the 6th century. An austere exterior masks a gothic interior that does not have the ornate grandeur of the Cathedral St Gatien but is still imposing.

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Address

Rue Colbert 2-14, Tours, France
See all sites in Tours

Details

Founded: 1224
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

archiseek.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maurizio Tazzer Dieterlen (2 years ago)
Vale mucho la pena visitarla.
Adeline Chague (3 years ago)
Magnifique concert dans l'église. Chauffage au-dessus de nous très appréciable !
Sergio (3 years ago)
Anche se rispetto alla cattedrale della città è giustamente più piccola, è una bella chiesa gotica dalla storia travagliata: parzialmente crollata, sconsacrata e usata per le stalle, parzialmente bombardata durante le seconda guerra mondiale, le sue vetrate ricostruite per tre volte; rimane affascinante, l'ingresso è gratuito.
Ignacio Aguirre (3 years ago)
Preciosa iglesia. De visita obligada si pasa por esta ciudad.
Justin Stone (3 years ago)
Founded in 510AD and rebuilt numerous times the church is a testament to the French ability to rebuild and survive. The stain glass, likely the 3rd installation over the 1500 years remains impressive.
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