Church of St. Julien

Tours, France

This 13th century church was built on the site of an earlier building – a church dating from the 6th century. An austere exterior masks a gothic interior that does not have the ornate grandeur of the Cathedral St Gatien but is still imposing.

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Address

Rue Colbert 2-14, Tours, France
See all sites in Tours

Details

Founded: 1224
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

archiseek.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

maria wong (2 years ago)
When u arrived Tours must 1st come here to check this place its near to the tramp station and at the start of the famous shopping street.
Linh Nguyen (3 years ago)
Beautiful ancien look church (i love how it looks ancien, not fixed or covered with new material). But too pitty there is a new style (look like a train station) in front of this architect which damaged all the atmosphere. Don't know who decided to put that ugly building next to such a beautiful ancien thing which is supposed to be valued and maintained the look of history ???
Wojtek Szkutnik (3 years ago)
Quite interesting church, going all the way to the VI century! Unfortunately, it’s closed due to covid restrictions.
Titou (5 years ago)
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