Church of St. Julien

Tours, France

This 13th century church was built on the site of an earlier building – a church dating from the 6th century. An austere exterior masks a gothic interior that does not have the ornate grandeur of the Cathedral St Gatien but is still imposing.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Rue Colbert 2-14, Tours, France
See all sites in Tours

Details

Founded: 1224
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

archiseek.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maurizio Tazzer Dieterlen (2 years ago)
Vale mucho la pena visitarla.
Adeline Chague (3 years ago)
Magnifique concert dans l'église. Chauffage au-dessus de nous très appréciable !
Sergio (3 years ago)
Anche se rispetto alla cattedrale della città è giustamente più piccola, è una bella chiesa gotica dalla storia travagliata: parzialmente crollata, sconsacrata e usata per le stalle, parzialmente bombardata durante le seconda guerra mondiale, le sue vetrate ricostruite per tre volte; rimane affascinante, l'ingresso è gratuito.
Ignacio Aguirre (3 years ago)
Preciosa iglesia. De visita obligada si pasa por esta ciudad.
Justin Stone (3 years ago)
Founded in 510AD and rebuilt numerous times the church is a testament to the French ability to rebuild and survive. The stain glass, likely the 3rd installation over the 1500 years remains impressive.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.