The church in Barrit origins probably from 1152-1160. It was originally white. The church went through several re-buildings but the present look is from a main restoration in 1879, where the old church was re-walled with red bricks from a demolished tilework in Breth.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1152-1160
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Christensen (17 months ago)
Nice and well maintained church large parking lot and located right next to the main road
Peter Christensen (17 months ago)
Nice and well maintained church large parking lot and located right next to the main road
Max Lindgreen (17 months ago)
A small cozy village church and definitely worth a visit and at the same time the area is full of scenic areas and not far from the tourist town of Juelsminde with its cozy atmosphere.
Max Lindgreen (17 months ago)
A small cozy village church and definitely worth a visit and at the same time the area is full of scenic areas and not far from the tourist town of Juelsminde with its cozy atmosphere.
Gitte Skov (18 months ago)
Nice cemetery
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.