Aarhus Theatre

Aarhus, Denmark

The Aarhus Theatre (Aarhus Teater) is the largest provincial theatre in Denmark. The present theatre house constructed in the late 19th century as a replacement for the old theatre, nicknamed 'Svedekassen'. Since Aarhus had grown to be Jutland's biggest city during the 19th century, the old theatre had become too small for the public. The new building was designed by the Danish architect Hack Kampmann (1856–1920), and the construction began on 12 August 1898. Only two years later the Theatre was completed, and it was inaugurated on 15 September 1900. The style of the building is Art Nouveau, with the national romantic emphasis on natural materials, and the interior was completed by artists Hansen-Reistrup and Hans Tegner.

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    Address

    Kannikegade 14, Aarhus, Denmark
    See all sites in Aarhus

    Details

    Founded: 1898-1900
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    Rating

    4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Ulrik Groth-Andersen (6 months ago)
    Always a good and cozy experience with a really talented roster of actors and actresses
    Ole Elmose (7 months ago)
    Beautiful theater from 1900 both outside and inside with 4 stages. Aarhus Main theatre with both classical and new plays - primary in Danish language.
    Jakob Bejer (7 months ago)
    Beautiful theater, everything is so well maintained & "cute". We'll be back..!!
    mia due (11 months ago)
    A fantastic place for a professional and surprising experience!
    Alan mark Kristensen (13 months ago)
    Great atmosphere, front line star destroyer parking, perfect 5/7!
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