Aarhus Old Town

Aarhus, Denmark

The Old Town in Aarhus, Denmark (Den Gamle By), is an open-air town museum consisting of 75 historical buildings collected from 20 townships in all parts of the country. In 1914 the museum opened as the world's first open-air museum of its kind, concentrating on town culture rather than village culture, and to this day it remains one of just a few top rated Danish museums outside Copenhagen.

The museum buildings are organized into a small town of chiefly half-timbered structures originally erected between 1550 and the late 19th century in various parts of the country and later moved to Aarhus during the 20th century. In all there are some 27 rooms, chambers or kitchens, 34 workshops, 10 groceries or shops, 5 historical gardens, a post office, a customs office, a school and a theatre.

The town itself is the main attraction but most buildings are open for visitors; rooms are either decorated in the original historical style or organized into larger exhibits of which there are 5 regular with varying themes. There are several groceries, diners and workshops spread throughout the town with museum staff working in the roles of town figures i.e. merchant, blacksmith etc. adding to the illusion of a 'living' town.

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Address

Viborgvej 2, Aarhus, Denmark
See all sites in Aarhus

Details

Founded: 1914
Category: Museums in Denmark

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ron Nicholas (8 months ago)
This assembled village demonstrates more than 300 years of history in Denmark. It's a living museum with homes and shops and other historic buildings from around Denmark. In 3 or 4 hours here you get a great idea of Danish history and life style. Actors in period costumes show and tell what life was really. Don't miss this special place and tell your friends about it.
KT Hue (9 months ago)
I love this place! It takes you back to hundres year earlier and shows people's daily life vividly. You can see how people work and live. There are a lot of inter-action programs, they're attractive and interesting and make yourself immerse to their stories.
Andrea Huérfano (9 months ago)
The place is amazing. You get to know and live what it was like to be part of the Danish society in prior centuries. It almost feels like being in a movie. And the idea of the actors works just perfectly. If you ask them something, they will answer and keep in character. You must plan in advance and devote at least 3|4 hours, otherwise you won't be able to walk the whole place.
Morten Nielsen (9 months ago)
An amazing place which impresses me always. The surroundings of the old (original) houses, the atmosphere and the exhibitions all add up to a unique experience, a brush of traditional Denmark. Combined with christmas exhibition currently running it is amazing - also in cold and rainy weather there is plenty to see.
Niraj Shah (10 months ago)
A great place to visit on a sunny day. This open air museum has plenty of buildings and shops to visit, and gives you a nice insight into traditional Danish life. The museum has old buildings from earlier periods and more modern ones, including a TV shop from the 80's complete with working retro televisions (and the prices they would have cost you). You can easily spend a few hours here, and the entrance fee is well worth the cost.
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