The Viking Museum is built upon the site of anarchaeological excavation that revealed various Viking Age structures, items, and parts of a human skeleton. The museum also provides information regarding the history of Viking Age Aarhus and also features copies of items on display at the Moesgaard Museum, itself located near Aarhus.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

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3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edit Somoskoi (5 months ago)
Very interesting exhibition in the city of Aarhus. Exactly as it was originally in the 12th century. Thank you!
Natalia Bilbao (6 months ago)
Even though it is a small place - you will not be more than 45 minutes there - and it is not a large exhibition, the fact that the museum is set exactly where items were found adds a note of excitement and interest to the place. Still, more things about the religion or Vikings' set of beliefs can be said.
Ramla mahamed (6 months ago)
Its a very quiet museum. I had all the museum to myself and there were voice (the machine tells you stories) so it could be scary sometimes. But otherwise its a nice museum to get to know the Vikings.
Kenny Persen (7 months ago)
Very small museum and hard to find from the street. You will have to know about this to find it. Tickets are self service and cost only 30 kroner which is no fortune but the museum is very very small. Worth a quick visit if you need to do everything but the much greater Moesgaard is definitely preferred
Steven Javor (8 months ago)
Excellent museum on the 5 Viking ships discovered in the harbour and now have replicas rebuilt. Very hands on museum based on Viking shipbuilding. Can actually go on a short trip on one of the rebuilt Viking ships. A lot of great information also available in English. Many photos and descriptions and an area where you can dress up as a Viking on go on a “Viking Ship” for photos. More a museum about Viking boats than Viking history or legacy. Best to go early as it gets busy near noon. Food available on site in the cafe or next door in tree restaurant. Lots of free parking and close to the centre of town.
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