The whitewashed church in Bjerre has a choir and nave from Romanesque period with a late Gothic tower to the west and a later porch to the south. The Romanesque building is in travertine without any visible plinth, and it has not kept special original details. In the late Gothic period was in the choir built one, in the nave three cross vaults and the choir arch was extended. At almost the same time the tower was added withan eight rib-vault in the bottom room and a round tower arch. In the north wall of the tower is a straight-running stairway up to the middle storey. The porch is built in monk bricks but it has no dated details.

The altar piece is a Renaissance structure from ab. 1630 with two pillars. It was decorated in  1741 and repaired in 1939.  The present painting, Christ is healing a sick, was painted by Anker Lund in 1892; an earlier painting, The Crucifixion, hangs above the exit door. Altar chalice from 1774 with names and coat of arms of Hans Helmer Lüttichau and wife. Balustershaped Baroque candelabres, from ab. 1650. The Romanesque granite font has a rather roughly carved basin with large lions and a dragon in flat-relief, divided by trees. The round foot has corner-knots. A South German dish with engraved coat of arms of Walkendorf and Egern-Friis. A sounding board from the beginning of the 1700s, similar to the choir desk, which has naive biblical paintings. Upon the desk stand two late Gothic small-figures of Virgin Mary and Sct Laurentius. A torso of an indefinable crucifix-figure is at Glud Museum.

A pulpit in Renaissance, ab. 1630, with Tuscany corner pillars and a contemporary sounding board. An interesting early Gothic bell from ab. 1325-50, without inscription, but with seal imprint, which in the shield shows a murtinde (wall peak) and the word 'Nicles...nes'. In the porch two very worn out gravestones from the late 1700s with naive Evangelist symbols.

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Details

Founded: c. 1150
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ibi Bøjlesen (7 months ago)
Bjerre church is a nice old place where traditions are kept.
Peter Christensen (11 months ago)
Nice and beautiful church
Kevin Sorensen (13 months ago)
Bjerre Church is centrally located in the village of Bjerre, approx. 8 km S of Horsens (Central Jutland Region). Until the Municipal Reform in 2007, it lay in Vejle County, and until the Municipal Reform in 1970 in Bjerre Herred (Vejle County). Choir and ship are listed in Romanesque style approx. 1150 of paving stones without visible plinth. Towers were built a little later a choir and porch was built in the late Gothic period (c. 1400-1500). Originally, in Catholic times, the church was dedicated to Saint Laurent. The church is plastered, which is why all original details are hidden. There is an old clause on the Korsgården that this should deliver the stone to the church in restoration. The choir and ship had a built-in cross vault in the late Gothic era, while the choir arch was somewhat transformed. The altarpiece is from 1625-30, the painting in the big field was done by Anker Lund in 1891. The painting that was previously in the big field hung there from 1850 and now hangs to the right of the organ. The pulpit is from o.1630. The pulpit has motifs of the four evangelists who are recognized by their symbolic animals. The baptismal sky and the coffin grille are from the beginning of the 18th century, on the coffin grille are two late Gothic figures, which are made by Mary and the Apostle John, these are copies and the originals were found together with a Jesus figure in the ceiling during the restoration of the 10930s. The originals came to the National Museum, while the Jesus figure must today be in storage at the Horsens museum. The sanctuary In the chancel's eastern sheath and in the vault over the chancel you can see frescoes from the latter half of the 14th century. The frescoes are rather fragmentary and were uncovered during the last restoration of 1996-1999. In the Eastern Cape the choir sees a somewhat distinctive Day of Judgment, in the middle is seen Christ with lily and sword, he is flanked by Mary and John, the group closely resembles a Crucifixion group. To the north is an angel with horns and weights, it must be Michael, who both awakens the dead and weighs souls. To the south, Peter is seen with a key and sword at the gate of heaven, under Peter is seen a hellhole, you see a saved soul and a couple burned by the shingles. Above the chancel is the Crown of the Torn and the Whipping. The Romanesque granite font has roughly hewn basins with lions and kites separated by trees, the pyramidal stump-shaped foot has corner claws like the West Jutland type and vegetative ornamentation on the surfaces, it is believed to be as old as the church. In the tower's floor are two tombstones laid down from the 1700s, which unfortunately can no longer be read. The organ is from 1967 and built in Horsens at Th. Frobenius and Co. The church bell, on the other hand, is also of older date and can no longer be dialed automatically. It was created between 1325 and 1350 and has a molded seal imprint and a partially legible inscription.
Ib Bøjlesen (15 months ago)
Lovely old well maintained church
thomas germer (2 years ago)
Super
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