Taavetti Fortress

Luumäki, Finland

Taavetti fort was built by Russians between years 1773 and 1803 to strategically important crossroads. It was part of the South-Eastern Finland fortification system and meant to defence Russia against possible Swedish attacks. The first phase in 1773-1781 a circle bastion was completed. Inner parts were built in 1791-1796.

Military use of Taavetti ended already in 1803. Fortress was nearly ruined when the renovation started in 1980’s. Nowadays it’s open for visitors and used for summer events.

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Details

Founded: 1773-1796
Category: Castles and fortifications in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.muuka.com
fortforum.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jorma Kovasiipi (2 years ago)
Hieno paikka kauniina kesäpäivänä, historian havinaa.
Topi Kangas (2 years ago)
Vanhat linnoituksen muurit on paikalla. Hyvää historian oppia useamman vuosisadan takaa. Antaa vähän perspektiiviä tällä päivälle kuinka ennen muinoin on eletty ja tultu toimee
Marko Nissinen (2 years ago)
Kiva frisbee rata
Сергей Кондуров (3 years ago)
Nice place. Have a walk and pick up some strawberries.
Markus Holmstrom (4 years ago)
An anchient star fortress in the middle of forrest if u have the imgination, its well worth it!
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