The Salpa Line Museum

Miehikkälä, Finland

The Salpa Line is a massive line of defensive fortifications approximately 1200 km long that was built in 1940-41 and in 1944 in order to defend the Eastern border of Finland.

The Salpa Line Museum in Miehikkälä is a museum on military history established in 1987 displaying the history of fortification works of the Salpa Line. The permanent exhibition of the museum consists of the exhibition and multimedia shows at the museum cafeteria and of guided tours to the fortifications on the outdoor museum area.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1940-44
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eoin Hendrick (3 years ago)
Great tour and very informative staff.
Jani Havulehto (3 years ago)
Best defence line man has ever build...worth visiting
Pavel Kann (3 years ago)
Large wartime museum with lots of items to see. Bunkers, canals and nice hiking routes along
Tatu Prykäri (4 years ago)
Interesting war museum. Good and informative tour. Recommended to anyone interested in World War II history
Vladimir Rusinov (5 years ago)
Interesting stuff. There are three walking trails, with bunkers and other fortifications along them. Shortest, red, is only about 500 metres and it's also the most interesting.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.