Château d'Ainay-le-Vieil

Ainay-le-Vieil, France

Built in 1300, Château d’Ainay-le-Vieil is surrounded by a moat of running water. Jacques Coeur bought the château in 1435 and Charles de Bigny (ancestor of the current owners) acquired in 1467. He built the main building in the late Gothic with Italian style.

In the large living room, a fireplace, one of the most beautiful fireplaces of the Loire Valley, remains of the visit of King Louis XII and Queen Anne of Brittany. For the chapel and its unique wall paintings, Charles appealed to Bigny workshop working on the cathedral of Bourges.

Memories of the Grand Colbert, minister of Louis XIV and Colbert’s all three brothers Napoleon's generals, are also presented.

In the park is a delightful and sweet-smelling rose garden. Some of the varieties of roses which are grown here date back to the 15th century.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maud Perrot (10 months ago)
Très beau lieu et visite historique intéressante. Les jardins sont superbes. Bon accueil des enfants même si il n'y a pas de visite adaptée pour leur âge.
rosie boyes (13 months ago)
Lovely morning spent in gardens
Helen Plowman (13 months ago)
Magical place
Héloïse Youngblood (2 years ago)
Great little castle and garden!
Guy Decaluwe (3 years ago)
Wonderfull chateau, well preserved and worth a visit!
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