The Château de Serrant is a Renaissance château built on the foundations of a medieval fortress. From the 14th century the castle was held by the Brie family. Charles de Brie was inspired to start modernisation early in the 16th century, but lack of funds meant the project was halted with only the North Tower completed.

Ownership of the castle then changed hands several times before Guillaume de Bautru, a State Councillor, purchased the property in 1636. de Bautru restarted the construction that had been halted over a century earlier. By using Charles de Brie's original plans and the same russet schist and white tuffeau stone, de Bautru ensured that there was a continuity of design. The central halls, two wings and the South Tower were added, with Jules Hardouin Mansart completing the work of de Bautru by building the chapel.

In 1749, the estate was sold by the last surviving descendant of the de Bautru family and was bought by Antoine Walsh, a shipowner whose family were exiled Jacobites. As well as redecorating the interior of the castle, the Walsh family built an English style park, pavilions, and a monumental gate complete with the family crest. The château eventually passed out of the hands of the Walsh family in 1830 when Valentine Walsh de Serrant married the Duc de La Trémoïlle. La Trémoïlle assigned Luciene Magne the task of restoring the castle and several features, including parapets and cornices, were added. The La Trémoïlle family still own the château, but in the 20th century it has been modernised with cellars and the introduction of electricity.

The castle is notable for the library, stocked with 12,000 books; the vaulted halls, originally home to the kitchens; and Napoleon's bedroom, which was never used by the Emperor as he stayed at the castle for only two hours.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leo Senra (2 years ago)
At the Chateau de Serrant, it was offered a guided tour 6 Euros more for me and my wife, but the tour was only in French. We took it anyway, and when we asked the tour guide to give a little bit of information I the end in English (he demonstrated that he knew basic English) he simple responded that the tour was in French and that he will not speak another language, since we are in France. It was a super rude treatment, at a place that is supposed to be for tourists. We simple went back and asked for our money. And left. So, unless you are French or speak fluently, this chateau is NOT for you. Foreigners not welcomed.
Gordon Woods (2 years ago)
Not sure why it justifies three Michelin stars. Good views but fairly dull interior. Didn't do the first floor though.
franky du 79 (2 years ago)
Beautifully furnished and top library. Guided visit is preferable.
Brittany W. (2 years ago)
Loved it. A piece of family history is always refreshing. Staff was kind but the guided tour is in French.
Miguel Eduardo Gil Biraud (3 years ago)
Very interesting castle! In the standard visit you get to see a couple of rooms on the ground floor, a couple of rooms on the first floor and get a glimpse of the to-be-restored rooms. Nice but not a must-see. The guided tour instead was amazing. Not only you will get the historical context of the castle but you will also get to see an impressive library (among the biggest privately owned in France), working rooms, restored bedrooms and a visit to the kitchen. If you are in the area I'd definitely recommend a 2h stop to visit this
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